Hotel amenity gifts of food ... What do expect the next day?

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by IMGone, Jun 8, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. IMGone
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    IMGone Silver Member

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    Many of us are lucky enough to have obtained status in one or more hotel programs, and as a result receive a variety of amenities from the hotel at arrival. My question revolves around the gifts of food, often fruit, and how/whether/should the napkin/plate/utensils be removed is used, be replaced if the used was removed or ???

    So, What do you expect or get when you are staying at a hotel over a number of days with regards to an amenity gift of food? Assuming it's delivered with (and you'd use) the utensils and napkins ...

    Are the used utensils removed the next day? Are they replaced?
    Is the used plate removed? Is a new one left in it's place?
    Is the dirty napkin removed? Is a clean napkin exchanged for a used one?
    Is the 'gift' replenished?


    I'm at a fairly nice hotel at the moment, and not only was the napkin and dirty dish left behind, they scrunched the remaining utensil in the used napkin a d stuck it into the corner of the fruit basket so they could clean the table, I guess. Needless to say, I was not impressed.

    In bangkok, they were awesome, clean everything left each day, the dirty stiff removed and the fruit replenished daily. I'd do fine without the third part, but hate having the dirty stuff sitting there, or having them take the dirty stuff then leave you without a napkin or utensil.

    Ironic that housekeeping removed something they should not have, but left the dirty dishes and used napkin/utensils behind :(
     
  2. BurBunny
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    BurBunny Silver Member

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    My belief is if you're done with something, it should be thrown away (or if too large, put a note on it). I prefer they don't take unused parts of a gift away, but it is superior service if they refresh the utensils. However, since the food is generally handled by room service and housekeeping doesn't have those in their carts, it is no big deal if not.

    My pet peeve is when they take away something I wasn't done with, such as half a bottle of wine for example. Unfortunately, I've had too many times that's happened so I leave notes to make it easier for them to figure out. Housekeeping is in a tough mind-reading job at times - I do what I can to help them out.
     
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  3. gleff
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    gleff Co-founder

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    Dirty/used items should be removed, no question. If the food items are still edible, and not replenished, but the utensils are dirty and removed then the utensils should be replaced. It's always nice when the food amenity is replenished but I do not expect that.
     
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  4. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    I always either hide the partly used wine and food or put a note on it. Unfortunately, housekeepers don't always read English, so just leaving a note can be risky. I wish hotels had some sticky things with icons, sort of like the do not disturb signs that don't depend on words.
     
  5. Counsellor
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    Counsellor Gold Member

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    It's sometimes even worse overseas. :D
     
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  6. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    and sometimes it's better overseas! Some top foreign properties amaze me in their ability to find housekeeping staff who do know English, for example in Tokyo and Hong Kong, plus even a few hotels in Shanghai. Of course it's no issue in places where most people know English, such as Scandinavia and Holland.
     
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  7. Counsellor
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    Counsellor Gold Member

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    Indeed.

    Reminds me of a negotiation I participated in at the Hague (Scheveningen, to be exact) some years back. At the end of the second day there was a dinner at which the senior Dutch representative stood and welcomed the U.S. delegation and inquired of the U.S. delegation lead whether he was enjoying his visit to the Hague. The U.S. lead said he was enjoying it very much, and that he found it quite different in some respects than he was used to in Washington.

    The Dutch lead responded that he would be interested in hearing some examples, to which the U.S. lead replied, "well, here the taxi drivers speak English."
     
  8. canucklehead
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    canucklehead Gold Member

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    I have found in most cases that they will take away the used utensils and plates (and anything partially eaten). For fruit, if it is unconsumed, they will leave things behind. I usually try to make it less of a guessing game and separate the stuff I want and the stuff they take away (a napkin on top is good sign). Any used plates/napkins/utensils should be replaced with clean ones.

    In a few places, I have found that they replenish or bring new foods (SGS BKK was a great example where everyday they brought a different assortment of fruits and biscuits). In a couple of examples, I think I ended up with a buffet bar of snacks at the end from the amount of food they brought!!!
     
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