Hong Kong Toilets and Hong Kong bathrooms

Discussion in 'Asia' started by NileGuide, Feb 4, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. Hong Kong toilets and where to find them?
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    Just to show you how easy it is to find a public toilet in Hong Kong
    What should visitors do when they get caught up sightseeing and can’t make it back to the hotel? Just remember that you never need to pay for a toilet in Hong Kong and you don’t have to really ask where the public toilets are because toilets easy to find in Hong Kong. It’s not that public toilets are a total nightmare but if you are used to Western cleanliness standards then there are better if not more convenient queue free alternatives. With a little common sense, most locals look in the usual places like shopping malls if not hotels that maintain the cleanest bathrooms.
    1. Avoid strolling into restaurants to ask if you can use their bathroom because the answer is going to be a big fat no, our toilets are reserved for customers only.
    2. Hong Kong MTR subway stations do not have public toilets so do not even bother asking where the toilet is in any of the stations.
    Hong Kong public toilets vary according to different neighbourhoods, like any urban city High rise business districts in the Central business district are going to have relatively well serviced public toilets that smell like nothing but bleach. The more densely populated neighbourhoods have public toilets that are a little more dirty and smelly.
    Sometimes the toilet paper hangs outside the toilet cubicles in the common washing sink area because very few old grandmas and grandpas like to horde toilet paper rolls and take it home for their own use. Hong Kong toilets are mostly standard, Western-style toilets and you’ll find that the squatting type toilets so commonly seen across the border to mainland China are less common in Hong Kong because of Hong Kong’s early English colonial times.
    If you really need to use a public restroom in Hong Kong then the best ones are found in public stadiums, public swimming pools and indoor sports arenas managed by the leisure and cultural services department.
    How to ask for the bathroom. The phrase is “Chi Sor Hai Been Doe” (“toilet is where”) or simply “Chi Sor?” with the raised intonation at the end. “Chi Sor” means toilet in colloquial Cantonese dialect in Hong Kong.


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