History of MDW

Discussion in 'ORD/MDW | Chicago Area Airports' started by Gargoyle, Jun 2, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. Gargoyle
    Original Member

    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

    Messages:
    22,014
    Likes Received:
    96,541
    Status Points:
    20,020
    I think the Tribune expires free access to stories after a few days, but you should be able to see this at the moment- history of Midway airport.
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-per-flash-midway-airport-0602-20130602,0,5210614.story

    mdw-historic.jpg

    Midway is the little airport that could.

    Despite numerous hurdles, it managed to become the busiest airport in the world, a title it held for at least 15 years. Don't remember the golden age? The little airfield on the city's Southwest Side understands that. It has battled low expectations and self-esteem issues since its birth in the 1920s.

    Midway has had many lives, and it appears another may be making its approach as the city considers turning over the airport's operations to a private company.
     
  2. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    12,787
    Status Points:
    10,675
    Gone :( Not free open access.
     
    Gargoyle likes this.
  3. Gargoyle
    Original Member

    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

    Messages:
    22,014
    Likes Received:
    96,541
    Status Points:
    20,020
    hm, still works for me. Maybe I have a tribune cookie. They used to give free access with a login, but my browser isn't showing logged in.

    Here are a few good parts:

    Growth was quick, and with it came growing pains. Already in 1929, aviation officials warned the city the airport was too small, too crowded and bordering on unsafe. "It is a crime to operate in the area with full loads and it will be nearly impossible to have the new thirty-two passenger planes land there," complained an executive of Universal Aviation Corp. Another big concern were the numerous student pilots buzzing around the same airspace, he said. In 1931, the Tribune reported a quarter of the nation's airmail carried annually by airlines passed through Municipal Airport.

    About that name
    Municipal Airport was renamed Midway Airport in December 1949 to "emphasize Chicago's position as the center of aviation and also honor heroes of the battle of Midway," the Tribune reported. The famous clash near Midway Island in early June 1942 had turned around the war in the Pacific when a much-smaller U.S. fleet sank four Japanese aircraft carriers and numerous other ships and downed hundreds of airplanes.
     
    anileze likes this.
  4. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,961
    Likes Received:
    12,787
    Status Points:
    10,675
    Fascinating the name change from Municipal to Midway was to honor the battle for Midway Isl.
     
    Gargoyle likes this.
  5. Sweet Willie
    Original Member

    Sweet Willie Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,048
    Likes Received:
    8,739
    Status Points:
    7,270
    I could not access the article either so thanks for posting the "good parts" !
     
    Gargoyle likes this.
  6. Gargoyle
    Original Member

    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

    Messages:
    22,014
    Likes Received:
    96,541
    Status Points:
    20,020
    I love the "great 50 passenger, four motored airliners" reference.

    Railroads fight back?
    A major sticking point in the airport's growth was the little problem of the railroad tracks running across the property at 59th Street, a ribbon of steel curtailing further expansion as effectively as a bird cage. In 1936, as "great 50 passenger, four motored airliners" were on the horizon, the airport was warned again of its limitations, this time by an infant United Air Lines. The sensible suggestion that the tracks be moved north of 55th Street would prove a herculean task involving the City Council, state legislature, Illinois Supreme Court and the federal government. It took more than five years. Indicative of the process: Even after the new tracks were laid, the Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad refused to tear up the old tracks until the city paid money into an escrow account to cover a piddling $10,627 it felt it was still owed.
     

Share This Page