Hilton Barbados Master Thread

Discussion in 'Hilton | HHonors' started by SST, Nov 26, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. SST
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    SST Silver Member

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    Spending this Thanksgiving weekend at the Barbados Hilton. Currently on the second night.

    Despite the entire building being demolished and the whole hotel being rebuilt five or six years ago, nobody bothered to make this hotel a particular showpiece: the hotel is solidly 4-star, with public spaces that scream 1970s architecture, a nice-enough (but not particularly palatially large) pool area, and a beach that is, uh, so-so. Not Hilton's fault that the ocean side of the peninsula is rather rough (a breakwater makes a small bay for swimming) and the actual bay side is a little rough too. The crescent shaped bay next to it is rather nice, and at least in late November not particularly crowded. The fish shack "Cuz" is rumored to have great flying-fish sandwiches for 1/4 the price of the pool bar, so I will try it tomorrow and reply here. It is a short walk down the bay crescent of beach.

    The pool bar itself has an almost unconscionably high price for a lot of things ($10 US for chips and salsa/guacamole; $6 for a local Banks beer---- compare this to US$1.50 at other local shacks, $3 at local restaurants). But there's not anything really close, so a walk up the beach is necessary to save, and we're not really talking prices more than I pay in San Francisco for local beer, and only a little higher than I pay for appetizers......

    The room is really very nice--- including al carpet which makes it seem like tile floors and area rug, but the room is essentially a standard Hilton Room from anywhere, with a 6' x 12' deck overlooking the ocean, a minibar, separate tub and shower (bad shower head, kinda drippy) no hand shower, tiny sink counter, unnecessarily hard bed, lotsa wonderful down pillows (bed therefore is excused, my particular back can make adjustments); and expensive taxis to any destination you wish right at the door. (Example: Friday night fish fry at Oisten's, about 10 miles south: BDS$30 ($US15) TO Oisten's; BDS$35 "quote" from hawker at Oisten's to get back, actually walked out on the road and got back for BDS$4 simply by taking a ride in a shared taxi. We had to walk in to Hilton from the main road (probably 10 min.).

    On arrival, we asked about a junior suite upgrade as Diamonds; they had us look at one, but upon return to the desk started to tell us how much extra we'd have to pay. We decided that just taking the executive level room was fine, this was only four days. And it is; it's just not compellingly luxurious. But it's not bad, either: after a couple days, we like the place.

    The bar unexpectedly has a happy hour from 5-6 (one hour, and they certainly enforce it). 1/2 price on a bunch of stuff, OK, so it was a good time, and they had a karaoke act on Friday and Sunday nights, very fun. Recommended. However, I was off at the restroom at exactly 6, and after Mrs. SST ordered another drink at last call, I was back in a minute and signalled the waiter for one too; that was charged at full price. Nickle-dime, nickel-dime. Not very impressive. Rather than say something, I decided on a 10% tip rather than my usual 20%.

    A couple notes: taxi fare to the Hilton from BGI airport is BDS $44 (US$ 22) and takes about half an hour due to traffic at 2 pm. Everyone takes US$, but gives back change in BDS$. Some don't like the US$ but nobody says much. Bus fare on the island seems to be BDS $2, pretty reasonable.

    People are INCREDIBLY pleasant and like to talk with you. Talk with them. There's at least a couple of mongooses on the Hilton property you will see--- a little strange. They apparently like to eat the endangered turtle eggs.

    We have not yet had a full meal here, basically because of the reputation and the costs of the hotel. The Executive Lounge is somewhat small, and despite having breakfast billed as lasting till 11, it was pretty picked clean by 10, and they were cleaning it up and slow to replace things. The lounge staff is good, and will give you multiple internet passes you need to connect multiple devices, since the "tight" Hilton system is a real pain with your Kindle, phone and computer. Breakfast was, well, adequate. Phony scrambled eggs from mix, good local smoked fish, assorted cheese (one kind=assorted), cream of wheat, various lackluster pastries, OJ and local Bajan cherry juice. Coffee was good; tea was impossible to get at breakfast because there was no hot water (sheesh!) . No decaf. No capuucino, espresso. Fruit was minimal.

    Tea time had tea (hooray!) and sweets, but no tea sandwiches or other savories. At cocktail hour they seemed to have some hot things.

    In all, it is a decent stay; a competent hotel, but far from luxury. More to come.
     
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  2. gleff
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    gleff Co-founder

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    My December 2008 stay:

    Back at the beginning of March, Hilton.com had several Carribean and South American properties pricing out at full rate for New Year’s Eve but then at $0 for all nights booked thereafter. It was a glitch, and one that folks at Hilton apparently didn’t realize existed for at least a couple of months. Not long after booking the rates corrected on the Hilton website, with the $0 rates being replaced by the originally-intended full prices.

    The deal was flagged for me by a co-worker, and I made the commitment not to share it broadly such as posting it on my blog. He was taking the trip for his anniversary and I didn’t want to jeopardize the deal.

    Two and a half months after booking the Hilton Barbados (among other possible properties were San Juan and Caracas), I got an email saying there was a mistake and they’d be unable to honor my rate as booked — but that they would extend a single free night (others who booked longer stays got 2 or 3 free night offers).

    I e-mailed back a firm but polite note, suggesting that this it was months after I made my Hilton.com booking I should reasonably be able to rely on it. And I had been in e-mail contact with the hotel as well, which suggested my reservation was fully in order. On the phone with the G.M. of the hotel, she subsequently offered me 50% off for the stay. That’s actually not a crazy price, to be sure, but I wasn’t going to make the discretionary trip to take advantage of it.

    My New Year’s Eve rate for a King Oceanfront Executive Floor room was $559/night plus tax (it was only incrementally more to confirm an ocean view, and only incrementally more than that for an executive room — but boy New Year’s pricing is expensive there for a standard Hilton!). 50% off would have meant $280/night plus tax, a deal for someone looking to book over New Year’s there, but not enough to fly to Barbados just for the deal.

    After some back and forth, the G.M. agreed to honor my originally-booked rate (pay first night at $559, get the rest of the stay free) as long as I consumed the stay outside of their truest peak dates of December 23 through January 6.

    The problem was in actually making the booking. This was all arranged by early June, but I kept making every possible attempt to contact the General Manager (a total of at least seven times) — who was the one that agreed to the rate, was the only one who could put it into place for me, and who stopped replying to my messages altogether.

    It took getting Hilton corproate involved a couple of times, one of which resulted in the group sales manager contacting me to let me know the G.M. was out of town. But at least at that point I had another person to prompt to get the G.M. back in touch with me.

    Finally, my stay with specific dates was booked. Only this wasn’t reflected properly on the Hilton website and I had nothing in writing to reflect the agreed-upon rates. Much more prompting and another phone call from the GM and things were set.

    I booked a couple of business class awards on American Airlines. Not the best use of points, perhaps, but pricing over the December period was quite high so an award made some sense and I had no desire whatsoever to make the flight down in coach. Availability really wasn’t bad, though oddly the hardest segment to secure was the outbound flight from DC to New York-JFK, fortunately inventory management opened that up for me so I didn’t have to buy the segment or head up to New York the night before. (On the whole I’ve found American’s award inventory on its own flights to be the best among US carriers, though I find Star Alliance to have better availability than oneworld generally, though I have had quite good luck with British Airways.)

    A 6 a.m. departure out of National Airport, including checking bags, and I arrived at 4:30 a.m. The airport was a zoo, with check-in for American wrapped around the terminal. Fortunately I was flying in a premium cabin, and I’m a lifetime elite in any case (thanks to American’s policy of counting all miles ever earned in an account, not just flight miles, towards million-miler status). There was only one person checking IDs at the TSA station, feeding into several x-ray machines for the pier out of which American operates. So the line to get up to a scanner was long. Past the screener and up to the lounge shorlty after it opened at 5 a.m.

    Flight up to New York was uneventful, as was the AAdmiral’s Club at JFK except to say that the lounge was expansive, had computers, and perhaps the worst tasting coffee that’s ever been brewed. Flight down to Barbados was utterly uneventful as well, though I still find American’s premium cabin food to rank towards the bottom of the major carriers. United’s is better, which is truly saying something.
    Another American flight arrived at much the same time as ours, parked just farther from the terminal than our aircraft did, and their passengers were bussed to the immigration hall — just beating us as we were instructed to walk. This created a bit of a line, and the immigration folks were in no hurry to process, still we were cleared through immigration in about 20 minutes. And we then proceeded to wait more than an hour for our bags. Mental note not to check luggage into BGI ever again if it’s possible to avoid it (as a bit of careful packing on this trip would have allowed).

    Cab out to the hotel, and efficient check-in. The cab driver said the Hilton was his favorite property on the island, remarking impressed that “you don’t even have to carry your luggage!” I guess he’s never driven anyone to Sandy Lane, though perhaps with the new Four Seasons he’ll manage a new favorite property.

    We were checked in right after a bevy of British Airways crew, given keys to our ocean view room and told about the Executive Lounge’s offerings. (I could have checked in at the lounge, but didn’t yet know where to go and this was just as easy.) Given a tour to the room by the bellman taking our bags, he proceeded to describe literally everything about the room, fretted that the ironing board was missing and promised to bring one right away! I assured him that wouldn’t be necessary and we were finally in Barbados, in peace.

    The beach is at the hotel was nice, and relatively uncrowded for a December weekend. There was a hotel attendant available to help set up beach chairs, and once set up you find yourself looking out at water a lovely turqoise. The beach is the highpoint of the property. The room furnishings and décor are not really to my taste, but then it’s a Hilton and it could have been just about anywhere in the world.
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  3. gleff
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    gleff Co-founder

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    The staff is all friendly, but this is the Carribean so service isn’t great and certainly not fast. Lunch by the beach meant extremely slow service, they didn’t bring everything I ordered, forgot to once I asked for it, and only felt empowered to comp me a drink by way of apology (manager took my entrée off the bill without my asking, once he came out).

    The executive lounge is too small considering the number of people with access. The top three floors of my tower, and top two of the other tower, all have access. The complimentary breakfast spread is nice, but the lounge is busy. I much preferred taking my breakfast downstairs, you can do the full buffet for just a US$10 upcharge over the complimentary lounge breakfast. And the coffee is very good, perfect for sitting outside and relaxing over a long meal.

    One feature of the executive lounge is complimentary wireless internet. They give you an access code and it’s valid for 24 hours, and they tell you it only works in the lounge — which is true, if you first use the code from the lounge. But if you take a code down to your room it will work there, giving you complimentary in-room internet which otherwise requires payment. Each day I asked for a code for myself and one for my wife so that I had a few extra codes to bring back to a colleague who would be visiting the property a couple of weeks after me.

    Breakfast was the only decent meal on property, and even the buffet was far from outstanding. The food by the beach wasn’t just slow, it was mediocre. They seem to serve the same food as room service, and draw from the same kitchen. So it’s best to go off property for meals. We had an inexpensive ‘fried bar food’-type meal one evening at the Waterfront Café, and also a dinner at Daphne’s.. which was absolutely beautiful, right on the beach, truly top notch service… The food was almost very good but always seemed to just miss, such as my foie gras which was ever so slightly burned.

    I was certainly happy here for the price, I paid about $100 a night for an oceanview room with lounge access. So ultimately no complaints for sure! But it was hardly the perfect experience.
    Off to the airport, I discovered a lounge airside that I hadn’t been aware of. It’s shared by several airlines and I walked upstairs and asked how I might have access. They ran down their list of associations, and stopped at Priority Pass and I quickly produced by card. The lounge was rather stylish, the automatic latte machine provided good coffee, and the reading material was ample. Food was limited, and it was a morning flight, I didn’t sample any of the mid-shelf liquor.
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  4. SST
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    Some more notes after a couple days. We ate lunch in the hotel restaurant yesterday due to really vicious showers lasting a full half hour which made the poolside resto a no-go. Got a BDD$30 club sandwich; passable but expensive, w/ fries. Sauvignon Blanc was BDD$16.

    Worth noting: you can actually drink the water in Barbados from the tap, and it's good. Thus, ice in everything, and water's a perfectly good beverage choice if economizing.

    We ate at Lobster Alive, up the beach toward Bridgetown. Excellent lobster and good jazz; about $US125 for dinner with a couple drinks. We got one medium lobster and fish-of-the-day, which was copio-- both were excellent and this was plenty. The real deal there is to get four people, order about a 5 lb lobster, and it's BDD$20 a head for the setup plus $60/lb for the lobster and sides. Everyone porks out. And as I said, the house jazz band is great, right on the beach. Reservations essential.

    We walked the beach to B'Town, nice except for dodging some nails and construction at the one hotel pier which is undergoing renovations. Had a nice time at the markets in town, went through the Parliament museum, and bought some coconut bread and had a beer. Nearer the boat docks is the wet fish market--- fun to see all the industry as people carved and sold and wrapped and ate, and there's a couple of little shacks nearest the boats where they serve a pretty passable flying fish meal for about $3. Great eating!
     
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  5. SST
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    Rented a car thru the concierge desk today; the person ahead of us got the last, or only, $BDD155 a day car, so we got a "big" car, a Yaris, for $195. This is all-in price, so $97.50US, which is more than a little high for a Yaris (wish I could make investments like that) but for BDD$30 they let you return it to the airport, so we are saving on taxi fare back, plus we really wanted to see more of the island than either the bus or a driver with limited time might provide. A driver from the hotel was US$35/hour, while I had a nice taxi driver offer me $BDD35/hour, and a fellow guest gave us a recommendation for a fellow they used at $US 100/day for a 5 hour day. We chose to self-drive.

    While in the rain it was a little crazy, but otherwise, a fine solution, especially since we decided to stop and have dinner out before returning on this, our last night. Good drive up the west coast, all the way to Speightstown, where we had lunch at Fisherman's Pub (recommended by a hotel staffer: cheap and on the water, grilled fish (unremarkable) and beef stew (excellent), plus conkies (like polenta) for Ms. SST, and mashers/gravy for me. Piton beer (from St. Lucia) was excellent to wash it down, in 275 ml, driver friendly bottle. Love small cold beersin hot climate.

    Went to Mount Gay (itself) and found the Mt. Gay aging facility and an industrial looking factory in the midst of sugar cane fields (and cats and kittens who apparently like molasses and the people who work there), but it was just a lark since we saw a sign to Mount Gay and decided to go hunting. However, on the way back we stopped by the St. Nicholas Abbey and its historical buildings (350 years old) and rum distillery. They store the good stuff here for 12 years, and served us a taste of the 8 year old product, which is lighter and I'd guess the cleanest rum I've ever tasted (new favorite). No tastes of the $90/bottle (US) 12 year old stuff. So we asked where on the island we could try some and noted the few locations we knew.

    We tried to go to Sandy Lane for a drink, but this is no longer possible: dinner or hotel guests only---no one else is allowed on the grounds. So much for Anthony Bourdain's TV visit as a PR device for Sandy Lane: we headed down the road to another place St. Nicholas recommended, Daphne's. Comedy of errors here, and I have to decide just how much to reveal. We arrived at 4:30, and were told the bar didn't open until 5, so we explored the Tamarind hotel and the beach for half an hour and then entered. We made a reservation for dinner, but they gave away our table. Suffice to say that since dinner starts at 6:30 and we had been buying drinks etc. for 90 minutes waiting, I wasn't pleased. The manager blamed it on a new staff member, but we ate a forgettable one-course dinner and split, since they needed the table they begrudgingly gave us back. I have more to say about the service and food, but unless anyone cares, skip it for tonight and maybe forever. I might try the Tamarind for a stay sometime, and I'm willing to give Daphne's a chance again. Let's hope it has improved the experience. The property itself is lovely, and the people who worked there seemed very nice. The sunset view is the best.

    The Abbey's 12-year old rum is incredibly smooth and wonderful. I'm not sure it's going to be worth the big bucks it's likely to cost you to actually get a bottle without visiting, but it was pretty amazing. The 8-year old product is my new favorite (if I can get it), and I'm not a real big rum drinker.

    All in all, provided the car return at the airport works out without a hitch, and the Hilton's morning bill shows up without any improper charges, this was a very nice experience and we should be back. Will update if things are amiss.

    One amplification for GLEFF's comments above: we were put in an "Executive Floor Upgrade" (no upgrade as far as I can see other than a free bottle of Australian Merlot, cheese plate left mid-afternoon of Day 1 and daily water bottles), but our internet from the lounge worked only on 3 of the days within the room, and always with only a single bar reception. On a stormy day, no reception- the 6th floor where we were in the Lighthouse wing is just too far. Also, the lounge issues "5 hour" passes for internet, and they only work on one device, so make sure you ask for a few, which they happily gave me. As a diamond, my laptop used the wired room connection (hopefully no $29/day fee to argue about), but both Ms. SST and I have an iPhone and I've got a kindle for the beach. So we needed 3 per session, using two sessions a day (breakfast and tea time, we picked 'em up). I got smart on day two and got a spare one, in case I wanted to check something on the phone at the pool. The reception with my iPhone 4s went as far as the first 12 or so chairs at the pools. Beyond that, it wouldn't reach, and they only have service that seemed to be specifically designed for meetings in their meeting rooms, for which my lounge passes didn't work. Internet works fine in the lobby. I really wish they'd just give this up and have open internet access everywhere, but I guess charging per device generates too much cash.

    In all, Barbados is a great place; the Hilton is a pretty nice hotel; getting around is fairly straightforward; roads (especially secondary roads) aren't marked all that well so if you drive you have to have your thinking cap on; the Friday Night Oisten's Fish Fry is worth visiting; food and beverage in Barbados can be good quality but service is not their strongest suit, although they're really nice people; Costs can be high but you can also economize; the water in November is warm as can be, but it can rain on and off, which isn't that much of a problem; and my general impression is that I'd like to come back.

    If you're reading this, hope your trip to Barbados is a good one, too!
     
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  6. Pete
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    Pete Silver Member

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    What are the chances of a Diamond getting upgraded to a suite (off-season - - June)?
     
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  7. SST
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    Have no idea on the suite upgrade prospects--- but low season has to be better. They showed us a suite, which was a three room affair, but they misunderstood my request at the desk and wanted me to pay big bux to get that room--- they wouldn't let it go complimentary. My guess is that this property holds the better rooms back, and gives little for status. On the other hand, the standard deluxe rooms were pretty nice, and we spent only our nights in the room. Barbados is for exploring, and the room itself was mostly adequate for our vacation.
     
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  8. newbluesea
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    newbluesea Gold Member

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    Personllay although it may be the "safest" I find Barbados the most boring of all the Caribbean islands I have visted. One thing is certain the beds at the Hilton Barbados IHMO are the hardest in the HH portfolio wordwide.:)
     
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  9. Pete
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    Boring? We were able to find plenty of things to do to keep us entertained in Barbados, if we so chose. What other Caribbean islands are you comparing it to?
     
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  10. newbluesea
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    Islands I have been to: Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago, Puerto Rico, Guadelupe, Grand Cayman, Martinique, Grenada, Cuba (and Swan Island :))
     
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  11. Pete
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    I see. You seem to be into the more mass-tourism locales (with a few exceptions_. By comparison, I have vacationed on Anguilla, St. Kitts, Nevis, SXM, St. Barts, all of the BVIs, all of the USVIs, Curacao. Barbados doesn't fit that mold, but love it nonetheless.
     
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  12. newbluesea
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    Its interesting how you are able to equate "mass tourism" to the larger islands many of which get far, far less tourists than Barbados but with no real experiences of ever visiting them.
    Of the places I have mentioned. :) Sure with exception of Grand Cayman (and off course Swan) all the other islands are indeed larger than Barbados... is that the "mass" you are talking about? Based on the islands you have listed your interests seem to centre around the beach which is mainly what those venues offer. My interests include scuba diving, interesting and varied scenery/nature and of course good inventive food (and drinks) . just to name a few.
    Barbados has nothing to compare with El Yunque P.R., the Cockpit country in Jamaica, The Caves or Hoguin in Cuba or even the rain forest reserve in Guadeloupe..

    I wont even go into depth about Cuba (since most US citizens are not allowed to visit there) but in Jamaica for instance can climb to the top 7000 feet Blue Mountain Peak and on the way visit a coffee plantation where some of the best coffee in the world is grown. Visit the only powder fine black sand beach in the Cariibean and ride a bamboo raft down a fast-flowing river.
    I believe the highest point in Barbados is under 1000 feet and one can drive around the island in about 2 hours..

    Most restaurants in Bridgetown close by 1000 pm but if you want great food one only has to visit Guadelopue or Martinique were the mixture of French and Caribbean cusiine outshines Bajan food by miles.:) or Puerto Rico with its strong Spanish influences.

    Diving: Everyone knows about Grand Cayman but I can swim 400 yds of shore Rio Bueno Jamaica (again) where the Cayman Trench drops some 3000 feet straight down.

    I think you should get point by now;) .
     
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  13. Pete
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    Pete Silver Member

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    Barbados is not my typical destination. Yes, beaches (preferably uncrowded - - e.g AXA has 33 exquisite beaches and a population of about 13,000), friendly locals, local food and some local culture are the keys for me. The population density in Barbados is one of the drawbacks in my book. But I found Bajans to be absolutely wonderful people, and found the island to be very safe. French food has no shine, in my book. ;)
     
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  14. Pete
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    Pete Silver Member

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    Received a very nice suite upgrade - huge corner room (-01) and separate "sitting room" (-03) with sofa-bed, desk, wet bar, separate bathroom. There was a lockoff door that allows it to be turned into 2-BR suite. The upgrade was granted when I requested it, and purportedly the only reason that I was not upgraded prior to request was that I had specified a 2-bedded room. If you have a choice on the suite assignment, the rooms on the other corner of the building (i.e. not -01/-03) would have a much better view and not nearly as long of a walk).

    We enjoyed our stay very much. The property is very nice (think good strong 4-star quality). Positives:
    • Staff (as with most Bajans) was without exception extremely friendly and went out of their way to please
    • Large pool and beach area, relatively few people using them at this time of year
    • Very happy with the large suite set-up
    • Property is still in pretty good shape for a Caribbean property (we stayed there within weeks of it opening in 2005)
    • Lounge access is a huge value on a family vacation - breakfast, drinks all day, afternoon tea/snacks, and evening happy hour
    • Better than average gym with decent amount of cardio equipment and killer views
    • Have seen reports of aggressive beach vendors, but we did not experience it
    • Plenty of restaurants and grocery stores within a quick drive (highly recommend a car rental - Regency had the best rates by far), so we like the location very much
    • Lots of free self-parking
    • Great summer rates, and would be an excellent value on HH points in high season
    A few immaterial negatives:
    • Wifi in lobby area (sometimes stretching to pool and beach areas) and lounge only (although reports are that it will be expanded soon). For multiple devices, access codes were required every 8 -12 hours (no charge for Diamond).
    • Food around the pool was a bit expensive (although generally decent tasting). We did not eat at any of the other restaurants on property, as there is no shortage of great restauarants in Barbados.
    • Beds are a bit too firm
    In short, highly recommend this property if you are looking to earn/burn HH points.
     

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