Here we go again: House Republicans attempt to revive Real ID (CNET)

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by Critic, Mar 3, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. Critic
    Original Member

    Critic Silver Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    30
    Status Points:
    150
    If you're a resident of one of at least 24 states including Arizona, Georgia, and Washington, your driver's license may no longer be valid for boarding an airplane or entering federal buildings as of May 11, 2011.
    That's the deadline that senior House Republicans are calling on the Obama administration to impose, saying states must be required to comply with so-called Real ID rules creating a standardized digital identity card that critics have likened to a national ID.

    The political problem for the GOP committee chairmen is that the 2005 Real ID Act has proven to be anything but popular: legislatures of two dozen states have voted to reject its requirements, and in the Michigan and Pennsylvania legislatures one chamber has done so.

    That didn't stop the House Republicans from saying in a letter this week to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano that "any further extension of Real ID threatens the security of the United States." Unless Homeland Security grants an extension, the law's requirements take effect on May 11.

    "If they don't, people won't be able to use their driver's licenses to get on airplanes," says Molly Ramsdell, who oversees state-federal affairs for the National Conference of State Legislatures. "They can use a military ID. They can use some other federal ID. But they won't be able to use a driver's license." (See CNET's FAQ.)

    The situation represents a setback to Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner (R-Wisc.), who championed Real ID as a way to identify terrorists and criminals. But instead of what supporters hoped would be a seamless shift to a nationalized ID card, the requirements have created a confusing patchwork of state responses--with some legislatures forbidding their motor vehicle administration from participating--and could herald chaos at airports unrivaled by any other recent change to federal law.


    ---

    Ugh.
     
  2. mht_flyer
    Original Member

    mht_flyer Gold Member

    Messages:
    3,016
    Likes Received:
    6,664
    Status Points:
    4,670
    This again? NH voted to prohibit it a long ways back.

    This will go nowhere again and be extended.
     
  3. mht_flyer
    Original Member

    mht_flyer Gold Member

    Messages:
    3,016
    Likes Received:
    6,664
    Status Points:
    4,670
    More important to put this in perpective:

    "The practical difficulties of implementing Real ID in only 10 weeks makes the House Republicans' letter political posturing, says Jim Harper, director of information policy studies at the libertarian Cato Institute.
    "Real ID was an unserious law, passed without a hearing in the House or Senate," Harper said. "This is an unserious letter, sent without regard for the consequences if the DHS did what they ask.""
     
  4. wiredboy
    Original Member

    wiredboy Silver Member

    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    83
    Status Points:
    275
    I wonder if it's part of the effort by the right wing to curb the "huge problem" of voter fraud. You know, the problem where the ones least likely to have ID are the most likely to vote liberal.
     
    kwai and GoneFlying like this.
  5. Critic
    Original Member

    Critic Silver Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    30
    Status Points:
    150
    As an update, it looks like DHS has relented and pushed implementation back another 2 years - hopefully enough time for a SCOTUS challenge to kill the law for good.
     
    mht_flyer and misman like this.

Share This Page