Heat lamps turned on to Chicago strikers; Hyatt apologizes

Discussion in 'Hyatt | Gold Passport' started by kansaskeith, Jul 22, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. kansaskeith

    kansaskeith Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    5,786
    Status Points:
    4,070
  2. kenbo
    Original Member

    kenbo Silver Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    735
    Status Points:
    645
    The manager who turned on the heat lamps is retiring today. It seems like this was his way of "sticking it" to them before he left.

    Not cool at all. I would definitely put it more on the actions of one individual rather than the hotel and/or Hyatt.
     
  3. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,503
    Likes Received:
    20,197
    Status Points:
    16,520
    No pun intended, I presume.

    Indeed. While I have to admit I am a little bit amused by the manager turning on the heat on the striking workers in a very literal sense, I would hope that no one other than a just-about-to-be-retired manager would be actually stupid enough to do this as it's something that can only backfire (NPI).
     
  4. Gargoyle
    Original Member

    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

    Messages:
    22,014
    Likes Received:
    96,541
    Status Points:
    20,020
    might have been the act of a single idiot manager, but if one person collapsed from the heat and was hospitalized, the hotel chain would be facing an lawsuit which would dwarf the costs of whatever the union is asking for in the contract settlement.

    I also wonder if this act violates any federal or state right-to-strike laws.
     
    cordray2643 and kansaskeith like this.
  5. kansaskeith

    kansaskeith Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,486
    Likes Received:
    5,786
    Status Points:
    4,070
    OK. here's my problem. For at least three decades, from my thirties all the way through my fifties, I associated "Hyatt" and "class act" together. They had the grandest properties, their people took the best care of you, and therefore, if you could afford it, you stayed there. I left them for a few years, then in 2010 said, "nah, I can afford it, I'm gonna go back to the class act." I've had problem after problem with Gold Passport since trying to return to them.

    The only way I found "milepoint.com" was by 'Googling' to find out if anybody else was having problems (the corporate GP customer service manager refused at that time to confirm my problems were anything but isolated to me). So, once I find Milepoint, I also find not only that there are Gold Passport problems for other travelers, but also that there were MULTIPLE problems with hyatt.com, from everything to ordering searches by price to cancelling a reservation with a full week to spare. And now today I see in the news that one of their managers -- even if only one guy or gal -- turned heat lamps onto protestors in 90-degree weather. They've still got some nice properties worldwide, and some good associates, but is the overall company still the 'class act' I had convinced myself it was? I'm not so sure.
     
    Scottrick and Gargoyle like this.
  6. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,503
    Likes Received:
    20,197
    Status Points:
    16,520
    A few bad apples are hard to avoid. I think Hyatt overall is still a "class act".
     
    Gargoyle and LETTERBOY like this.
  7. cordray2643
    Original Member

    cordray2643 Silver Member

    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    170
    Status Points:
    395
    Please remember where this took place. If we knew everything that happened like this during a strike, we would all be thoroughly depressed.

    It is Chicago!
     
    tommy777 and Gargoyle like this.
  8. Gargoyle
    Original Member

    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

    Messages:
    22,014
    Likes Received:
    96,541
    Status Points:
    20,020
    in this case, even if it is an individual who is leaving the company, it is the responsibility of the the company to train all managers in proper, legal behavior during a labor dispute. When a manager violates that, it reflects on the entire training and compliance efforts of the larger corporation. The corporation is responsible for the actions of the manager. The same goes for the unions- picketers are carefully instructed in the rules and laws, and told the consequences of violating those limits.
     
  9. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,503
    Likes Received:
    20,197
    Status Points:
    16,520
    Yes, not disagreeing with you. I just don't think Hyatt is rotten to the core for having hired a manager that, on his last day, makes a stupid/rude decision.

    In the meantime, dozens of striking hotel workers were apparently arrested in SF in front of the GH.

    http://www.sfexaminer.com/local/201...ested-san-francisco-hyatt-hotel-labor-protest
     
    kenbo and Gargoyle like this.
  10. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    I would hope that any manager, assistant manager, or management trainee would have the common sense not to order heat lamps turned on during a heat wave and to take immediate action and apologize if it is discovered that this was done by accident or by a rogue employee. Not only is it wrong and does it risk medical consequences for people, but also it will be very bad for public relations when it's discovered. Supplying water was the right thing to do.
     

Share This Page