Flying with CPAP device

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by milchap, Jul 5, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. milchap
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    milchap Gold Member

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    While browsing the AC website, I came across this.....

    No medical approval is required for customers travelling with a CPAP or BPAP machine that is required for the treatment of sleep apnea only. However, you must contact Air Canada Reservations if you plan on bringing the machine on board with you, even if you will not be using it.

    I have travelled many times and have never advised AC that I would be bringing my CPAP as carry-on. Never knew this regulation existed !
     
  2. uggboy
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    uggboy Gold Member

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    Thanks for this info, didn't know either. :)
     
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  3. londoncalling

    londoncalling Silver Member

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    I know several people who travel with those devices onboard and are never ever asked about them. Keeps the snoring down on long haul flights. :p
     
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  4. maradori
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    maradori Silver Member

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    :eek: :eek: :eek: Whoops, I thought I only needed to call res if I would be using it. I wonder what's the rationale for needing to call if it's unused?

    if only AC reps would come to MilePoint, then we could ask ....
     
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  5. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Was in 1D yesterday, on a Dash, and had someone plop himself down next to me in 1F, holding a small carry-bag containing a CPAP machine. FA very politely, and just as very firmly, redirected him to sit in a non-exit row.

    Have never had to open the exit door, myself, but it does stand to reason that people in need of assistive devices ought not to be seated next those doors.
     
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  6. milchap
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    milchap Gold Member

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    :confused: I travel with such a device......and am able to open the emergency exit. I am not "crippled".....just need device for better sleep at night.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
  7. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Good point, Sir; good point indeed!

    The gentleman in question was definitely frail-looking, so perhaps that conditioned the FA's response to his being seated next the door.
     
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  8. satman40

    satman40 Gold Member

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    I laugh when they started to moved a blind lady, truth was she could see in the dark..

    The FA let her stay, once she talked with her.., and realized how often she flew, seems she commuted from IND / LAX every week, and taught IT at Cal Tech,

    Imagine writing code in you mind,and hearing a whisper at 30 feet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2015
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  9. GoldenFlyer

    GoldenFlyer Silver Member

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    Well this machine for pontoon sleeping ape they need it while sleeping only so no need in flight while they are not asthmatic they can not get an attack.
     
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