First class foodies on path to food poisoning after failed hygiene inspection

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Dining' started by sobore, Nov 21, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.news.com.au/travel/trave...giene-inspection/story-fn6yjmoc-1226759677733

    [​IMG]

    NEXT time you're travelling first class, be sure you're well fed before the flight.

    A hygiene inspection has uncovered some dirty kitchen habits that will have passengers travelling in British Airways' flagship first-call lounge gagging out of disgust.

    Either for the rotten food, or the $AU17,000 price tag, we're not sure.

    Out-of-date eggs and dirty kitchen utensils were among the notable bad hygiene habits associated to BaxterStorey, which credits itself as "the UK's leading independent contract catering services".

    "Unchilled" sandwiches, a dirty ice machine and food chiller were among the items found with the rotten goods, while one worker was seen preparing raw salmon with his unwashed, bare hands.
    Sausages and scrambled eggs were also found to be kept in less than cool conditions.
    "These types of food are likely to support the growth of food poisoning bacteria or the formation of toxins," the report said.

    They were given a "poor" rating for food hygiene for BA's first class lounge and Concorde Room at terminal five, reports The Scotsman.

    Even the local council gave the venue a measly two-out-of-five score and ordered the catering company to take swift action.

    A spokeswoman for the company said: "BaxterStorey and British Airways will continue to work closely to improve services to achieve the very high standards we demand as a business.


    Read More: http://www.news.com.au/travel/trave...giene-inspection/story-fn6yjmoc-1226759677733
     
  2. MX

    MX Gold Member

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    Is this perchance related to IAG's rising profits? ;)
     
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  3. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    Eww.
     
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  4. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Honestly, there's little surprising in this story. If most airplane galleys and food served in-flight were regularly inspected according to FDA regulations and inspection standards (and especially internationally), there would likely be very many stories such as this one. :eek:

    For more information about FDA food and inspection standards, see:
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/ComplianceEnforcement/Inspections/ucm211823.htm
    http://www.co.nicollet.mn.us/vertic...10}/uploads/FoodSafetySelf-InspectionForm.pdf
     
  5. mattsteg
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    mattsteg Gold Member

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    Yes, better conditions would be good, but this ridiculous style of journalism is at least as repulsive.

    Rotten food gets mentioned several times, with no documentation of such being found. Pathetic.
     

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