East/West flyer flies 'new' routes for a change

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by dhammer53, Dec 28, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. dhammer53
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    dhammer53 Gold Member

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    I usually fly JFK/NYC to LAX or SFO. After 20 years, I can tell you where I am just by looking out the window. Same can be said for route variations when I fly NYC/ORD/west coast or NYC/DEN/west coast. It gets to be ho-hum.

    Earlier this month, I flew SJC (San Jose CA) / IAH (Houston). This was a totally new route for me. I was pretty much glued to the window as we flew southeast. After about 60 minutes, we flew over ABQ (Albuquerque). I've been to ABQ, but it's only from the air that I realized how big it is. The entire flight was a pleasant change of scenery.

    In November I had the same experience as we flew home, from Santiago Chile to JFK. My seat was on the right, so I was lucky enough to see the sun rise in the east. I never see the sun rise or set when I fly.

    Tell us your story.
     
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  2. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Silver Member

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    I fly YQR-YYZ and vice versa a ton. Once, a few years ago, on a WS flight on that route, we took a more southerly route than normal and flew over northern lake Michigan, as far south as Green Bay. It sure looks nice from the air.

    Last year I flew YQR-YVR (I route I don't fly much) and the AC/QK pilot was ebullient. It was a perfect clear day all along the route and the pilot kept giving us reports of what was out our window as we flew past. Never have I seen the entire interior of British Columbia while flying overhead, as the few other times I've flown the route, it's been night or cloudy.

    I have seen the sun rise (YQB-YYZ) and set (many times) while in the air. It seldom gets old.
     
  3. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    Years ago I was flying STL-LAX with TWA on a very clear day and we were early, so the pilot got ATC permission to do some sightseeing loops around the Grand Canyon, clockwise and counterclockwise, so that everyone could see it from the air. I loved it.
     
  4. Gardyloo
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    Gardyloo Gold Member

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    I commuted regularly between ANC, SEA and LAX in the early 80s. About ten days after the big eruption on Mount St. Helens I was on a LAX-SEA segment on Alaska Airlines. How he did it I'll never know, but the pilot came on the horn about 90 min. out of LAX and said he'd gotten permission to push the pedal a little so we could have time to do a fly-over of the volcano and still make our landing time at SEA. So we did a figure-8 at the mountain - right 360 loop then wing-over and a left 360 so that people on both sides of the plane could look at the mountain, or what was left of it. He stood off - guessing - around 10-15 miles from the crater so he didn't have to bank too sharply (and also I assume there are tricky updrafts near an active volcano) and also probably because of somebody at ATC not wanting to stick his/her neck out farther than it already was. It was a spectacular, if horrible, view - miles of grey landscape and blow-down trees, lakes of mud, and the formerly beautiful cone-shaped mountain looking like a giant had taken a big bite out of its side. I didn't have a camera (of course) and the rest of the flight into SEA was in silence.
     
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