Dumping luggage at Dallas: what choice did Qantas have but to leave baggage behind?

Discussion in 'Qantas Airways | Frequent Flyer' started by sobore, May 25, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,421
    Likes Received:
    33,847
    Status Points:
    16,520
    http://www.ausbt.com.au/dumping-lug...e-did-qantas-have-but-to-leave-baggage-behind

    Earlier this week Qantas deliberately left three containers of passengers' luggage at Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) due to concerns over fuel consumption for the QF8 flight from DFW to Brisbane.
    But did Qantas really have a choice?
    That's an opinion being thrown around by some industry spectators, who claim the alternative was to risk ditching the plane into the sea, 200km off the Australian coastline.
    "Welcome to how airlines operate all throughout the world. I personally don't see this as controversial," wrote one member of the Australian Frequent Flyer forum.
    "Another boring aviation story that'll apply to one flight a year or DYKWIA [don't you know who I am] types who don't understand how the business works," suggested another.
    Aviation journalist Ben Sandilands, who has been reporting on the airline industry since 1960, emphatically rejects that proposition.
    Sandilands argues that Qantas management has been taking a foolhardy approach, ignoring the warnings of pilots that Qantas' 747 aircraft were unsuitable for the world's longest direct 747 route.
     
    milchap and drewbles like this.
  2. Globaliser
    Original Member

    Globaliser Silver Member

    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    676
    Status Points:
    720
    Exactly. A regular occurrence, all over.
    No doubt this also means that the 747-400 is totally unsuitable for IAD-LHR flight, because I was on one when we had to leave 5 ULDs of bags behind.


    It is undeniable, though, that it's a bit embarrassing for QF on a new route that's known to be a bit challenging.
     
    drewbles likes this.
  3. Pinkmoose
    Original Member

    Pinkmoose Silver Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    26
    Status Points:
    145
    Just flew the SYD to DFW leg last night (or whatever day it is now, stupid jet lag), and Qantas was very cautious with everything going onto the plane. Although my wife and I only had one check in bag (out of the allowed two), the check in staff still measured the weight of our carry on bags and they were doing this for all passengers. They were insistent that the carry on weight no more than 7kn, even though It meant I had to carry my DSLR out of the bag.. This is the norm for most places in the world and I don't see a problem with this.
     
  4. NYBanker
    Original Member

    NYBanker Gold Member

    Messages:
    32,725
    Likes Received:
    191,901
    Status Points:
    20,020
    Does QF still have the 747-400ERs? Are these used for this route, or just a regular -400?

    The "ditching in the ocean" scenario is a bit dramatic. Fuel consumption is monitored during the flight, and if needed, though not ideal, alternate ports can be called upon enroute.
     
  5. drewbles
    Original Member

    drewbles Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,823
    Likes Received:
    12,277
    Status Points:
    10,520
    Very much have the ER's. The last one was only delivered around 2001, so they're not really that old.

    The older 744 non-ER models are being put on some domestic segments here, in an attempt to counteract Virgin Australia's push with Business Class on their new A330's.
     
  6. NYBanker
    Original Member

    NYBanker Gold Member

    Messages:
    32,725
    Likes Received:
    191,901
    Status Points:
    20,020
    Do they operate this service exclusively with the -ERs?
     
  7. drewbles
    Original Member

    drewbles Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,823
    Likes Received:
    12,277
    Status Points:
    10,520
    I believe so. The inaugural flight was operated by VH-OEE which is an ER.

    They'd need it for that. It's the longest 744 flight in the world.

    And as a side note, she was delivered to QF in December 2002, so not old at all really :)
     
  8. Globaliser
    Original Member

    Globaliser Silver Member

    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    676
    Status Points:
    720
    Now, please.

    Please let's not let facts get in the way of a good story.
     
    NYBanker likes this.
  9. milchap
    Original Member

    milchap Gold Member

    Messages:
    27,699
    Likes Received:
    148,145
    Status Points:
    20,020
    If weight restriction is a common occurence......just limit the number of pax.....or include a technical stop....but do make certain that pax and luggage are on the same flight.
     
    NYBanker likes this.
  10. NYBanker
    Original Member

    NYBanker Gold Member

    Messages:
    32,725
    Likes Received:
    191,901
    Status Points:
    20,020
    QF?

    I'm not sure which suggestion is less likely to be implemented...asking for reporters not to be unduly dramatic or asking QF to let a few seats go unsold! ;)
     
    milchap likes this.
  11. Toula
    Original Member

    Toula Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    4,807
    Status Points:
    2,400
    If they can't carry a passenger's luggage they should not be selling them the tix. When I buy a tix I am entitled to a certain amount of luggage and oddly enough I expect that luggage to fly on the same plane as I am on.

    If they are having problems meeting the weight restrictions they need to sell less tix on the flight. It shows poor planning on the behalf of Qantas, or any other airline who is deliberately leaving luggage behind, and passengers should not suffer as a consequence.
     
    MSPeconomist likes this.
  12. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    I would hope that if they're leaving passengers' luggage behind for weight they're not carrying standbys or nonrevs.
     
    LETTERBOY likes this.
  13. Globaliser
    Original Member

    Globaliser Silver Member

    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    676
    Status Points:
    720
    When you plan the number of seats to be sold, you can't know which days are going to have unusually high winds and unusually restricted payloads.

    Similarly, you won't know until the day how much baggage everyone is going to bring, and what the aggregate amount is.

    If you're asking the airline to limit the number of seats sold to the maximum number on which they guarantee that all passengers will be carried with the full baggage allowance that each one is theoretically entitled to (which very many passengers don't use), you'll probably find that services like this are uneconomic and impossible from the word go. This is a completely unrealistic approach.

    I expect that what QF is doing is what airlines everywhere have been doing on payload-restricted routes since the dawn of modern airlines: plan so that you will be able to operate the flight normally on the vast majority of occasions, and find ways of improvising your way out of trouble (eg leaving some bags behind) on the few days on which something unusual is happening. I've been seeing this personally since CX started operating YVR-HKG and HKG-LHR using 742s, and it's not going to change in a hurry.
     

Share This Page