DOT ruling on United Mistake fare

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Miles/Points' started by flynhwn, Feb 23, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. flynhwn

    flynhwn Silver Member

    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    206
    Status Points:
    360
    The mistaken fares appeared on a website that was not marketed to consumers in the United States. In order to purchase a ticket, individuals had to go to United’s Denmark website which had fares listed in Danish Krone throughout the purchasing process. In addition, only people who identified “Denmark” as their location/country where billing statements are received when entering billing information at the completion of the purchase process were able to complete their purchase at the mistaken fare levels. Consistent with the Office’s treatment of fare advertisements and disclosure of baggage fees, it does not intend to enforce the rule in question (the post-purchase price increase prohibition) when the fare offer is not marketed to consumers in the United States. Additionally, the Office is concerned that to obtain the fare, some purchasers had to manipulate the search process on the website in order to force the conversion error to Danish Krone by misrepresenting their billing address country as Denmark when, in fact, Denmark was not their billing address country. This evidence of bad faith by the large majority of purchasers contributed to the Enforcement Office’s decision.

    We should have just kept quiet.
    Now airlines have a precedent.
    People mocked me when I suggested that they just let it go. Now we all suffer the concequences.
     
    Kalboz likes this.
  2. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,504
    Likes Received:
    20,199
    Status Points:
    16,520
    You should not have lied if you indeed misrepresented your billing address country. Simple as that.
     
    Efilon87 and Kalboz like this.
  3. satman40

    satman40 Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,481
    Likes Received:
    2,455
    Status Points:
    1,325
    +1
     
    Kalboz likes this.
  4. Kalboz
    Original Member

    Kalboz Gold Member

    Messages:
    9,003
    Likes Received:
    22,430
    Status Points:
    15,020
    I am sure they honored the fare for their Danish customers who actually lived in Denmark (if any) where the error occurred.
     
    satman40 likes this.
  5. WilliamQ

    WilliamQ Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,499
    Likes Received:
    14,270
    Status Points:
    10,675
    I might be mistaken but I thought the fares were correctly listed. It was the conversion to USD that screwed up. If a Danish customer paid their fare using a Danish credit card, I thought there was no mistake fare.
     
    Kalboz likes this.
  6. Wandering Aramean
    Original Member

    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

    Messages:
    28,217
    Likes Received:
    61,749
    Status Points:
    20,020
    Nope, because the DoT does not have jurisdiction over transactions in Denmark. Or at least that seems to be the claim being made.

    USD was not part of the conversion issues.
     
    Kalboz and WilliamQ like this.
  7. WilliamQ

    WilliamQ Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,499
    Likes Received:
    14,270
    Status Points:
    10,675
    My bad.. USD is indeed not part if the issue.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/today...st-class-to-europe-sold-for-just-68/23234223/
     
    Kalboz likes this.
  8. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    Folks who claimed to reside in Denmark just to take advantage of the mistake fare have no case, by any law. They entered fraudulent information to try to get tickets and, in most cases, succeeded. They all should be prosecuted for fraud rather than be rewarded by the US government.
     
  9. Wandering Aramean
    Original Member

    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

    Messages:
    28,217
    Likes Received:
    61,749
    Status Points:
    20,020
    At what point in the booking process did anyone claim to be living in Denmark?

    Changing the site Point of Sale does not mean saying you live there; it means you wish to purchase a ticket there. And I think you'd have a hard time proving that not changing the billing address country is fraud.
     
    satman40 likes this.
  10. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    This is no rocket science: a benign input error becomes a clear sign of willful fraudulence when an inordinately large number of people who have no business or a valid reason for doing so suddenly change their "site Point of Sale"... If it turns out that the particular site that saw increased activity also had mistake fares, then it is a slam dunk.
     
    satman40 likes this.
  11. satman40

    satman40 Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,481
    Likes Received:
    2,455
    Status Points:
    1,325
    Many Change their billing address, and retain their physical address, to save sales tax dollars,

    I guess it is a form of deception, if you get caught, the states would call it a crime.

    This was a good judgment call. .Neither party was injured.
     
    Kalboz likes this.

Share This Page