Do you know of any good travel-novels?

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by torbster, Feb 14, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. torbster
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    torbster Silver Member

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  2. PSUhorty
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    PSUhorty Silver Member

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    I’ve always liked Paul Theroux (although it seems he can come off as a bit arrogant at times). Try ‘The Happy Isles of Oceana’.
    While not a travel writer, Jim Harrison (my favorite author) did produce one travel book- ‘The raw and the cooked- The adventures of a roving gourmand’. It is of his travels around the world and the U.S. and eating. It is not your typical ‘Anthony Bourdain’ type of travel/eating book, however. Jim Harrison is a truly gifted author. In this particular book, what he’s eating at the time, and with whom, allows him to become deeply introspective at times- which he puts in paper for us to read.
     
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  3. torbster
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    torbster Silver Member

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    Cool! Looks like Oceana is situated in alot of places that's at the top of my next-travel list, like NZ, samoa, tahiti.. I'll check it out! Thanks!
     
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  4. JasonH
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    JasonH Silver Member

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    Not exactly what the OP was looking for, but I spend a good bit of time writing my own travel novellas. Not only is it a great way to remember the trip, but it's an awesome coffee table book when friends are over. We get them printed up on high gloss paper and book bound. So, given that, I spend a lot of time scribbling notes and thoughts while on planes (along with taking pictures like a first-time flier).
     
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  5. Westsox
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    I am a big fan of Bill Bryson: A Walk in the Woods, In a Sunburned Country.
     
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  6. torbster
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    torbster Silver Member

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    Actually I try to do the same! Write a little now and then when I'm travelling, just need to find a good story to connect the dots. Want to write something fictional mixed with own experiences, then let the readers guess what's fictional and not. :D
    How much would you pay for something like that? Would make for an awesome gift to family and friends
     
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  7. restlessinRNO
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    restlessinRNO Silver Member

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    Balkan Ghosts, by Kaplan, is an interesting historical travelogue , concentrating on the former Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria and Greece.
     
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  8. wanderlust
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    Not really a "travel novel," but I really enjoyed Playing for Pizza by John Grisham, a decidedly non-legal-themed book about Italian food, meals, and culture, with annoying diversions into the "plot," involving an American football player adjusting to Italian football leagues and his uninspiring "romance."
     
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  9. Mangy
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    Mangy Gold Member

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    Take a Kindle. Then just scroll through till you hit a book you like
     
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  10. chgoeditor
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    chgoeditor Silver Member

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    I'm also a Bryson fan, though his technically aren't novels (though I guess many of these suggestions aren't). In terms of fiction, I think you can find inspiration in a lot of novels that aren't strictly travel related. Take, for example, the Davinci Code phenomenon....those books have led to a host of Davinci Code-related tourism. I predict the same will happen with the Steig Larsson books.

    I'm currently reading "The Media Relations Department of Hezbollah Wishes You a Happy Birthday," by Neil MacFarquhar, a foreign correspondent who's spent much of his career in the Middle East.

    For an anthology of writing (fiction and non-fiction), I highly recommend picking up some of "The Collected Traveler" series by Barrie Kerper. It's not a travel guide, per se, but he gathers a great collection of writing about region into a book with some visitor recommendations. Whenever I'm visiting a place where a Collected Traveler book is available, I try to buy it and then wait until I get onto the plane before I begin reading it.
     
  11. Monkey Girl
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    Monkey Girl Gold Member

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    I'm reading Theroux's Ghost Train to the Eastern Star - if you enjoy train travel as much as flying, you'll like this too. (Arrogant? Maybe it's just a 'been there, done that' attitude?)
     
  12. Monkey Girl
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    Isn't a Kindle too cumbersome?
     
  13. Mangy
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    Try carrying a thousand books[​IMG]
     
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  14. Mangy
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    Mangy Gold Member

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    Great book. You would also like his earlier book 'the Great Railway Bazaar'
     
  15. Mangy
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    Mangy Gold Member

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    BTW, perhaps not the best place for this (and I will put it elsewhere later, but if you like travelling by train, I find that the best possible Website for helpful information is The Man in Seat 61:

    http://seat61.com/

    Loads of information on pretty much every train in the world
     
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  16. MSPeconomist
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    Changing Places by David Lodge, IIRC Penguin Paperback. What happens when you don't get your work done on a flight to Australia. (Hint: In your presentation, read the same single sentence over and over. It gets funnier.)
     
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  17. Tinkerer
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    Arthur Hailey's Hotel (and Airport too, though I always thought Hotel was one of his best) gave a great "insiders" look into the running of things - for me it's become a classic!
     
  18. Westsox
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    On Island Time, Kayaking the Caribbean by Scott B Williams is a great look at the Caribbean from a different perspective. Not your typical travel novel but a good read that cover much of the things we never see from the comfort of our airplane and resort hotel.
     
  19. Tinkerer
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    With your e-book reader of choice in tow I've found I travel MUCH lighter ;)
     
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  20. chgoeditor
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    chgoeditor Silver Member

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    Not at all. It's thinner and weighs less than any single book I could possibly read. And I'm much more likely to read several books on a trip, which really weighs me down. (Now, you may have only seen the largest size Kindle...the DX, I think.) I have the second generation and it's quite reasonably sized.
     
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  21. Monkey Girl
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    I meant in comparison to other e-readers, not to actual books. [​IMG] I have a Kobo - doesn't have all the bells & whistles, but it's even smaller & lighter. Unfortunately, I just discovered that Borders just filed for bankruptcy - there goes any after-service! [​IMG]
     
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  22. chgoeditor
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    Ah, sorry...my mistake. But good clarification/info for others who might be considering an e-reader.

    You may not be completely out of luck re. Borders. From my understanding, they're trying to reorganize their debt, not close the doors entirely. I guess it also depends on whether your reader is serviced by Borders directly or 3rd party companies that are paid by Borders. (If it's the latter, they might revolt, refuse to do service work unless Borders guarantees their payments.)
     
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  23. JasonH
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    Maybe not physically cumbersome, but some research seems to suggest that an e-reader might not stimulate your brain the way a book does and therefore you are less likely to recall what you read. Of course this is just one piece of non-peer reviewed research right now, but it does continue a trend started when our ancestors first started putting spaces between words. Imaginehowmuchharderitwouldbetoreadifeverythingwaswrittenlikethis. [​IMG] Hat tip to Nicholas Carr's "The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains" for that bit of literary educational history. Yes, I read that in read book form.
     
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  24. bea61
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    Right now, I'm enjoying Living in a Foreign Language by Michael Tucker. I'll read anything by Bill Bryson. Plane Insanity by Elliot Hester is an interesting behind-the-scenes view of air travel.
     
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  25. Lalala
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    Lalala Silver Member

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    Eat, Pray, Love - bien sur. KIDDING.

    I love Paul Theroux, Sara Wheeler, Redmond O' Hanlon is also great. Tim Cahill who used to write for Outside has a few good books including "jaguars ripped my flesh". Jonathan Raban also comes to mind. A few years ago, I read an account of a young man who was sent from England to the Canadian Arctic as a clerk for Hudson Bay. Fabulous. Here's a link to the book.

    Oh yeah, Driving over lemons is pretty damn funny.
     
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