Do flight crews regularly remove passengers without good reason and without accountability?

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by Fredd, Jul 28, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. Fredd
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    Fredd Gold Member

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    I receive and enjoy David Rowell's - the Travel Insider - newsletters.

    In discussing a recent situation in which a Jet Blue captain allegedly removed a passenger for less than compelling reasons (and of course this is only one side of the story), Rowell goes on to write, in part:

    This regrettable incident is merely the tip of the iceberg. How many times have we read about passengers being taken off planes for 'being unruly'. When making such accusations, and taking such actions, airlines should be compelled to involve every passenger from several seats all around the allegedly unruly passenger, with all those passengers not just giving statements but being required to sign complaints about the alleged unruliness.
    Furthermore, every such allegation must be followed up either with the arrest and trial of the passenger so complained about, or, alternatively, with the arrest and trial of the captain and crew for lodging false complaints and for wasting police time.
    The current situation, where a captain in the cockpit can say 'I am god, and she is unruly' and have the police obediently do whatever he says, with no supportive testimony from unbiased other passengers, is being roundly and regularly abused and must stop.

    http://blog.thetravelinsider.info/2...ad/thetravelinsider+(The+Travel+Insider+Blog)

    While I think he's carrying it beyond the reasonable - demanding that charges be laid against, somebody, anybody - I can't help but feel there's possibly a germ of truth in there.

    What do others think?

     
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  2. kw335
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    kw335 Silver Member

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    Some folks are just simply having some thirst of ... power :)
     
  3. Fredd
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    Fredd Gold Member

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  4. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Bingo. While I am sure some pax get removed unneessarily, there are probably also cases where a proactive removal prevents an in-air situation. I suspect removing a pax comes with paperwork for the captain, so I am not sure how often this privilege gets invoked without a reason.

    Personally, in all my flying (I'd guess a total of 1.3 million miles across various airlines) i have never seen anyone getting removed.
     
  5. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    I've seen people removed from planes, in one case about twenty, of whom two were arrested, after a return to the gate after maybe twenty minutes of waiting in line to take off. I've also seen individuals removed when it appears that a FA was having a bad day and on a power trip. There's an infamous TATL purser who has been known to remove passengers he doesn't like or doesn't think should be in the front cabin.

    However, the one case I observed where someone should have been removed was long before 9/11. It was an off duty pilot who had just finished captaining a wide-body TATL flight back from Europe who was drinking heavily in FC in uniform and literally grabbing the (female) FAs. When we landed, most of the FC cabin reported him to the airline's supervisor or manager on duty.
     
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  6. Captain Oveur
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    Captain Oveur Gold Member

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    Then you go to the Chicken and the Egg argument.

    But to answer you original question, yes, there should be more accountability. Short of a completely egregious situation the size of neon lights in Times Square, the employer will likely back up the employee through the tired "anything for security" mantra.
     
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