Crew taking OUR storage space!

Discussion in 'United Airlines | MileagePlus' started by trobb49, Feb 8, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. trobb49

    trobb49 Silver Member

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    I recently few on a 3-class 777 (with my wife) in seats 7AB which are just in front of the galley. Although there weren't too many people on board yet, when I went to put my suitcase us, the two compartments above our seats. I had to find alternate storage area further forward. Fortunately there were 4 empty seats in the forward cabin so there was still room, but had the plane been full, there might not have been place left for the late boarding passengers.

    There used to be some storage compartments between First & Business, but they were removed, obviously, to create more seating space. Now the crew has no place to put their bags except in OUR space, it seems. Not only is it a space problem, we also had to put up with crew members periodically accessing the space to retrieve belongings, etc.

    All in all, not a huge problem, but perhaps a good argument for sitting in the aft section. That also allows you to escape from the various noises and smells of the galley area.
     
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  2. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    If they'd put the bags a row forward then it would have inconvenienced those passengers, right?

    It isn't your space. Never has been. It is shared space.
     
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  3. zippypinhead

    zippypinhead Gold Member

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    Been happening since I started flying commercial airlines forty years ago. Do you expect that they're going to check their bags?
     
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  4. Flyer1976
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    Flyer1976 Gold Member

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    Airline Crewmembers have designated spaces per the company as to where store their bags and it has to be complied with.

    It certainly does inconvenience people but it is their work environment so what can we do? Nothing except suck it up and move on.
     
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  5. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

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    Forward is far worse, but that's almost always where the crew keeps their stuff. The front couple of bins usually have the safety materials, the crew stuff and often oxygen/first aid. But add this to the fact that there is no underseat storage at the bulkheads and the result is some people sitting in the first few rows often have to put their bags several rows back.
     
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  6. Flyer1976
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    Flyer1976 Gold Member

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    Personally I think that the first OH Bins on all flights should be closed and allocated to the First Class Passengers only or these in Bulkhead rows.
     
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  7. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Given the fact that most airlines now view a passenger's bags as a cash cow, and some charge for carry-on bags, what's to stop all the airlines from charging for carry-on bags in the very near future? Or even charging the air crew for stowing their bags?

    Although all airlines appear to have "carry-on bag-sizers", I can't recall seeing one of these being used over the last decade of travelling on most all the US-based carriers. Word has gotten out to most coach-class travelers that it's O.K. to schlep your largest bags onboard the plane to avoid airline checked baggage fees. And the games played by passengers (many in first class) of bringing carry-ons that subsequently need to be checked "planeside" (at no-fee) are truly fun to watch.

    Why not just charge for everything carried on the plane, and go ahead and weigh in all the passengers and their bags, charge all by weight, and put an end to all the theatrics?
     
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  8. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    Reality. This will simply never happen.
     
  9. LETTERBOY
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    LETTERBOY Gold Member

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    Yep. The FA unions would go nuts. And I never agree with unions on anything, but they'd be right in this case.

    Probably nothing (some idiots in Congress would make noise, but I doubt anything would come of that). In fact, I wouldn't mind if they did.
     
  10. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    http://www.spirit.com/OptionalServices
     
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  11. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Unfortunately, the Spirit Airlines business model could well end up as a template for all US airlines in the future. And the one thing that I've learned to not state is that something will never happen in the future. Specifically regarding air travel, I recall the days of wide coach class seating, being served a steak dinner with dessert while in the same seating, with an option to smoke a cigarette after the meal, in-flight. Did anyone travelling in the air at that time even imagine today's tight coach class seating, lack of meals, no smoking, and heavily restrictive airline security? Of course not!
     
  12. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Just taking away the smoke makes all the other changes worth it :)
     
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  13. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    Unlikely. They barely serve as the model for a small segment of the market today.

    And, FWIW, the width of seats in Y on narrow-body planes hasn't changed much in a few decades. The 737/757 fuselage diameter has been the same for a long, long time.
     
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  14. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    707 seat map from 1977:

    http://boardingarea.com/frequentlyf...ne-seat-map-american-airlines-boeing-707-123/

    Looks not all that different from today. Pitch might be E+ style in the entire coach cabin. Early MRTC? ;)
     
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  15. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    HaveMilesWillTravel, thanks for posting!
    Concerning the experience of flying this AA airplane configuration in coach class, Darren Booth's quote says it all:
    "Keep in mind this was back in the days of generous seat pitch in coach, and service to match...Coach seated 123 passengers in the typical 3 x 3 layout. My guess is that smoking was allowed plane-wide. For those not old enough to know any better, this bird typically had open “shelves” above the seats and was flown during a time of more civility, as well as when most (all?) people actually checked their luggage. Could you imagine the carry on situation today with such a setup?"
    Newscience
     
  16. LETTERBOY
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    LETTERBOY Gold Member

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    What's changing is the width and diameter of the passengers.
     
  17. Golfingboy
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    Golfingboy Gold Member

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    Actually, many long haul carriers does that. Crew bags also are the first bags that comes out on the claim, so majority of the time it is already circling the carousel by the time they get there.

    Not that I care, but might be a good idea for UA to start offering crew the option to check their primary luggage.

    ETA: Talking about UA longhaul, not domestic service.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2014
  18. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    That may work if you fly HKG-SFO and then spend a couple nights at a hotel (I have seen international carrier FAs claim their giant steamer trunks and often wondered what they were smuggling), but if you're a domestic crew bouncing all over the place during the day, there is no time to go pick up bags and recheck them. And I think limited overhead storage is a much bigger problem on narrow-bodies than wide-bodies. I never really worry about overhead space on long-haul flights.
     
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  19. Golfingboy
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    Golfingboy Gold Member

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    Of course, I was referring to crews flying long haul flights, which seems like what the OP was flying [unless he was on one of the few domestic 3-class service].
     
  20. daboogah

    daboogah Silver Member

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    my better half is a 3 cabin chief purser for an Asian airline and they are told to put their carry on bags behind the last rows and on the long hauls, they check in luggage. They usually grab their bags and run but recently, the only other carrier started making their crew wait to grab luggage so customers can leave first. So now her airline is "recommending" crew wait and even if bags come out, wait on the side until the last passenger gets their bag. Imagine a US carrier actually making the passenger feel like they are the customer ... GASP!
     
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