Counterpoint: Delta takes flight attendant fatigue seriously

Discussion in 'Delta Air Lines | SkyMiles' started by sobore, Jun 4, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/209735721.html

    The May 26 article “Many flight attendants dangerously exhausted” examined an issue that Delta Air Lines takes very seriously. We work closely with our flight attendants to help ensure they have adequate rest opportunities.

    We believe the vast majority of our flight attendant professionals, who take great pride in their training, customer service and good judgment, would take offense at the assertion that they would choose to fly routes where they would not have the opportunity for adequate rest.

    A few key points the article overlooked:

    • Delta’s rules for flight attendant rest, which exceed Federal Aviation Administration requirements, offer great flexibility for attendants to choose the length and duration of trips they work, and they have the ability to manage their schedules to ensure adequate rest

    http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/209735721.html
     
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  2. SM105

    SM105 Silver Member

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    The US FAA rules on crew rest and flight duty time limits are hopelessly outdated and almost counter-productive in their nature. Most other jurisdictions of equivalent competence (eg. EASA) have adopted a system in line with CAP371, which remains the most comprehensive and authoritative study of air crew fatigue.

    I've managed airlines which have used both FAA standards as well as CAP371 standards for crewing. I can state, from personal experience and with no hesitation, that reported instances of crew fatigue under a CAP371 program are significantly less than under an FAA program. Yes, the CAP371 FDTL scheme is significantly more complex and also has its faults and loopholes, but I truly believe that it can make a huge difference with regards to the human performance aspect of aviation safety.

    For more information on CAP371, check out the UK CAA website that features the original CAP371 report.
     
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  3. AMPfromBNA

    AMPfromBNA Silver Member

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    Ironically, as I fly to LGA this morning in an empty FC, there are two FAs up here, both of which are completely passed out. One of them is literally snoring a bit.
     
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  4. USAF_Pride
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    USAF_Pride Gold Member

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    Where is the original article?
     
  5. SM105

    SM105 Silver Member

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  6. Davescj
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    Davescj Silver Member

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    Was the FA on duty? If so, sleeping is a NO NO. If they are pax (dead heading, etc), they are welcome to sleep.
     
  7. AMPfromBNA

    AMPfromBNA Silver Member

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    Dead head. They were fine to be sleeping... Just ironic given the new thread post.
     
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