Continued 787 issues

Discussion in 'United Airlines | MileagePlus' started by thptrek, Jun 11, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. thptrek

    thptrek Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status Points:
    40
    Was supposed to fly 787 today from ORD but it already has been cancelled due to equipment issues. Just read that a JAL flight had to turn back after takeoff last night due to problems with anti-icing equipment in the engine. Seems like the Dreamliner continues to be a Nightmareliner.

    I think I am going to avoid booking any 787 segments for the future until things get fixed. Getting cancelled is no fun.
     
    jbcarioca likes this.
  2. Black Cloud
    Original Member

    Black Cloud Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,895
    Likes Received:
    21,505
    Status Points:
    10,720
    Meh. It's actually relatively common for new equipment. The a380 was grounded for a while due to both engine oil feed issues and wing cracks. This is part of the teething process.

    But, yes - if you want to increase the statistical likelihood of not being on a delayed/canceled flight due to a mechanical reason - avoid a 787 for a while.
     
    mht_flyer, jbcarioca and LETTERBOY like this.
  3. jbcarioca
    Original Member

    jbcarioca Gold Member

    Messages:
    17,507
    Likes Received:
    57,455
    Status Points:
    20,020
    As a technicality, the wing crack issue was a mandatory inspection at 1300 hours or above but was not a "grounding". The Rolls Royce engines oil feed issue caused grounding of the RR powered A380's so EK and AF were unaffected since they were powered by a different engine. Technically, BTW, the B787 was not subjected to an airworthiness certificate lifting, but an emergency airworthness directive that ahd no specified means of compliance. The world probably did not notice that technical, but important difference.

    People forget about incidents and accidents quickly, such as the BA B777 crash due to fuel icing on approach to LHR and the DL B777 dual engine failure at altitude for the same reason. Such issues have been part of most new airliners, as you say. Dispatch reliability and fuel economy/weight have usually been the big problems, but they quickly fade away. Nobody even thinks of the P&W engine failures in the early B747 anymore, much less the B777 or even the A380 wing cracks and RR engine problems.

    Two years from now nobody will easily recall the B787 issues, not that very many do now. I'm not anxious to fly it again soon because of reliability, but I'm never excited to risk delays or cancellations if I have an easy way to avoid them. I'll fly it happily in a couple of years, and I'll need to because it will replace most of the B767's I fly now, with the remainder going to the A350, for which I'll like to wait a while after service entry also.
     
    Gaucho, MX and LETTERBOY like this.
  4. mht_flyer
    Original Member

    mht_flyer Gold Member

    Messages:
    3,016
    Likes Received:
    6,664
    Status Points:
    4,670
    Didn't parts of a Qantas A380 engine fall to the ground?

    My point goes back to Black Cloud, once the battery issues resolved now just some growing pains.

    I can't wait for a opportunity to fly on the Dreamliner.
     
    jbcarioca, LETTERBOY and Gaucho like this.
  5. guberif

    guberif Silver Member

    Messages:
    686
    Likes Received:
    1,060
    Status Points:
    825
    Wonder how many maintenance issues non-787 equipment had yesterday? Just because it's an mx issue, doesn't mean it's a Dreamliner issue.
     
  6. jbcarioca
    Original Member

    jbcarioca Gold Member

    Messages:
    17,507
    Likes Received:
    57,455
    Status Points:
    20,020
    The Qantas incident/accident (classified differently depending on source) was the Rolls-Royce engine story. The captain on that flight wrote a book about it:
    http://www.amazon.com/QF32-ebook/dp...1?ie=UTF8&qid=1371041910&sr=8-1&keywords=QF32
     

Share This Page