Coffee Discussion (acid).

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Dining' started by dhammer53, Jun 12, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. dhammer53
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    dhammer53 Gold Member

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    I usually drink a regular or decaf coffee. Last week, I decided to get a darker robust blend instead of the usual regular or lighter blend of coffee. I found the darker roast didn't have the acid associated with the other types of coffee.

    I enjoy the joe, but hate the acid.

    Now before you say I should/should not go to Starbucks, or should/should not go to a local deli or bagel store, I'd like to read your opinions on coffee, and the acid it contains.
     
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  2. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    I have found the acid comes from improper brewing or coffee that has been ageing.
    When the right coffee/water ratio is used and the brewing temperature is correct the acidity tends to be very mild.
     
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  3. Gaucho
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    Gaucho Gold Member

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    another thread that could use from jbcarioca's input me thinks..... ;)
     
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  4. RachaelMurphy

    RachaelMurphy New Member

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    I remember reading that green coffee beans have a good kind of acid that roasted coffee beans lose. It's all the rage these days since it's linked to weight loss. Anyway, I think both the kind of beans and the roasting influence the acidity. Some south American coffees are very acidic even after roasting them dark. Here's where you can try a variety of coffees and just order them online http://www.dailycuppacoffee.com/coffee
     
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  5. clscholes

    clscholes Silver Member

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    The roasting process can heavily influence taste, whether acidic or not, as well as location the beans were grown, etc. In general ("in general"), darker roasts contain less caffeine and tend to end up "less" acidic, while blonde or light roasts are heavier in caffeine and a little more on the acidic side, but the two aren't always linked. The water you brew with can influence the entire process as well.

    I may or may not drink too much coffee...this entire explanation and a dollar still won't get you a cup of coffee in most places...;)
     
  6. mhnadel
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    mhnadel Silver Member

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    There are lots of variables involved - the terroir of the beans, the storage, the roasting, the brewing method. Experimenting to find what you like is valuable.
     
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  7. karung99
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    karung99 Gold Member

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    I love dark French roast coffee, the aroma is so great! especially fresh grind and freshly brew. It is also less caffeine and less acids
    I don't like old coffee that has been staying at warmer for long time (15 mins) after that it is dirty hot water.
    At home I use French press or stove espresso pot.
     
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  8. uggboy
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    uggboy Gold Member

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    Nespresso. :) Smooth as George...
     
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  9. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    Other things remaining equal, which we all know they are not, IME the following general rules apply:
    1. The darker the roast the less acidy taste. Generally the darker roasts accentuate a softer mouth feel and have more texture.
    2. Water with a single pass through the coffee will have less caffeine and less acid taste, a sweeter taste. Thus the least acidic taste is from real espresso (NOT Starbucks, which is not prepared nor roasted by traditional standards, so generally tastes acidic and bitter unless modified with sugar, milk and/or syrups) with a close second a French Press.
    3. Water with a low mineral content tends to absorb less caffeine and other coffee components yielding bitterness. Pure distilled water is best, with a very low mineral content bottled water (e.g. Evian) a much more expensive and slightly less desirable alternative.
    4. The beans themselves are obviously of critical importance. Many of the best roasters rank their beans by various metrics, including bitterness. Frankly, the roast is almost as important as is the bean (assuming a high quality arabica bean, anyway). Roaster rankings are better than nothing.
    5. Organic beans tend to be sweeter and less acidic. That is not related directly to their certifications, but to the fact that they're grown usually under non-mass conditions so tend to have better care and more likely to be grown under the shade of large trees. In any event they have not had pesticides directly applied. The harsh industrial acidic taste often comes from, among other things, pesticide residue. That is really bizarre, because coffee was designed by nature with a built-in pesticide, caffeine, and really needs little if any pesticide. Organic helps!
    6. Never allow coffee, however it is brewed, to sit. Nothing so destroys coffee taste so quickly as waiting to be consumed.
    7. Never use any method that allows coffee to come in contact with water more than once. Percolators are evil! They select for bitterness and high caffeine content.

    So those are my seven heavenly tactics for good coffee. I do not mention specific bean types (other than avoid Robusta) because you can get good non-acidic coffee using a wide variety of beans. However, the best taste is an entirely different matter, and there the specific bean makes a big difference.

    Finally, on the coffee farm of one of my relatives and in the area where I live there is quite a lot of experimentation to find the best growing techniques, storage procedures, curing and roasting processes. All of that does yield a good rule of thumb for the ordinary non-obsessed person who just wants a good cup of coffee.

    So, the secret solution is: use a Nespresso/Illy or other capsule machine that has a variety of choices. Try their capsules until you find what you like. You cannot screw them up. They're good every single time. Zero need for exotic technique. Only problem, they're cheap to buy and expensive to renew capsules. Almost all the seriously knowledgable people I know either do that themselves or use an automatic machine (expensive to buy, cheap to refill (well, relatively).
     
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  10. dhammer53
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    dhammer53 Gold Member

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    I've switched to the darker roast since this thread began. My coffee enjoyment has gone up.
     
  11. norge
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    norge Silver Member

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    A dark roast 100% Kona coffee is my favorite. Rich but not acidic. Unfortunately it runs $35-$40/LB so I don't drink it very often. My daily coffee is Sumatra (bold) from Starbucks.
     
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