Chase apparently has a very big problem

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Credit Cards' started by disambiguous1, Nov 11, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. disambiguous1

    disambiguous1 Silver Member

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    I just got the Chase Sapphire card for my business (the corporation hasn't been around long enough to get an Ink card). I have not used the card at all yet, got it less than a week ago. All I've done is activate it. It's stayed in my wallet, and the companion card is in my safe.

    I got a call today from Chase Fraud Protection that the card had been used to make a $1 charge to Terminex, of all places. Looks like the card was cloned from inside their own system. Scary. -DA1
     
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  2. felixishim

    felixishim Active Member

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    Nope, Chase Additional card has the same card number as your card so likely your card is compromise from your daily use, at least that's what with the personal freedom card, may be different from a business card
     
  3. Mapsmith
    Original Member

    Mapsmith Gold Member

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    Also a $1 charge is commonly used when a merchant installs a new card reader. I would imagine that this is what has happened and that you should see a $1 credit shortly. Or just point it out to Chase and they will reverse it.

    This could happen when the processor gives a wrong number to the merchant to use. Happens quite frequently.

    If you are seeing the $1 charge as "pending" this is most likely the culprit.
     
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  4. estnet
    Original Member

    estnet Gold Member

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    Yes, except why would fraud prevention call him if it was just one of the "check if the card is good" $1 runs?
     
  5. Mapsmith
    Original Member

    Mapsmith Gold Member

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    Probably because the card number was registered to him. A $1 charge is something that does not indicate a stolen card or number in most cases. (The bad guys for some reason use a number like $14.28 which sounds like a normal purchase. A $1 purchase is darn near impossible to be a valid purchase. That is why the CC companies use it as a test.)
     
  6. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

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    Sometimes a $1 charge is a preliminary charge, to be definitized later. I note that the purported charge is from Terminex. If they were hired for a project they might run the $1 preliminary charge in advance to confirm that the card is a valid card, then after doing the job would put through the actual (final) amount.

    The key here is whether the charge is a preliminary charge or not.

    If the Fraud folks called, though, I'd take it seriously. The preliminary amount is no indication of the size of the final charge. And if you haven't begun a transaction with Terminex, I'd definitely inform the fraud folks.
     
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  7. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    The $1 is usually an authorization, not a charge. And, yes, there is a difference.
     
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  8. disambiguous1

    disambiguous1 Silver Member

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    It was not an "additional card", it was a *brand new account.* Repeat, totally new, new card, new account number, etc. The card had *never been used*, meaning the nothing had ever been charged to that brand new account. Never. One card had been kept in a RFID-safe pouch on my person, the other had been in a safe.

    There is no way that the card number could have gotten out into the world via myself.


    The ONLY ways the card(s) could have been compromised is either in the mail or by way of an internal Chase security leak or a hack. Either that or Chase has started recycling CC account numbers AND exp dates (and perhaps the security codes on the mag strips), which is not likely. DA1
     
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  9. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    What did the Chase security "experts" tell you when you explained that?
     
  10. satman40

    satman40 Gold Member

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    CC number are generated, anyone can write a program to generate the numbers,

    Once done you check it out, to see if the number is active...
     
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  11. pilotb757

    pilotb757 Silver Member

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    Happened to me a few months back, $1 charge from an unfamiliar merchant which is just an authorization and it never posted, but to be on the safe side I requested a new card with a new account number.
     

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