Change in Direction?

Discussion in 'Community Center' started by aanswer, Aug 8, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. aanswer

    aanswer Silver Member

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    Hello all!

    Since traveling has essentially been the most interesting part of my life for the past 2 years, I figured I'd ask fellow travelers of a fairly big decision.

    Currently, I work in media and advertising. I do fairly well for myself and manage a huge team of innovators, designers, technologists and the sort. A great group of people for the # 1 company in the business.

    I've been offered a job -- in a similar field for an industry celebrity to be his right-hand man. This guy is pretty big! Emmys, Oscars, TV Shows, etc. The problem is that it's a one-man shop. The not-a-problem is that I get to live my life the way I want. Work from home. Work from New Zealand. Work from my bathtub. Basically, work from anywhere. It pays a little bit more.

    So -- my question is -- what do I do? If I take option # 2, it'll be a step back in the corporate rat-race (which I'm not a big fan of anyways). If I stick with # 1, I'll be doing silly work. (and I need to love what I do. I've left companies if the job was boring or not-so-challenging).

    Thoughts?
     
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  2. jbcarioca
    Original Member

    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    It looks very much as though you've already decided. I think the one-man-shop works well so long as you really, really liked the boss. If not, not!

    You already have said how you feel about corporate life.m Will you really enjoy not having a large staff? Will you be free of silly work in the other choice?

    In my career I have been an employee of a multinational, the CEO of several companies, an entrepreneur with a large staff and a one-man-show.
    Despite listing the pros and cons of each and trying to make rational choices I have been happiest when I made the choice on emotional terms. That is why I suggested you'd already decided.

    YMMV, so congratulations on having really good choices! Please let us know what you decide.
     
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  3. aanswer

    aanswer Silver Member

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    Heh! Good guess.

    I'd be happy not having a large staff. For me the work is always more important than the bureaucracy. Right now to get a small project done, I need to get 6 people in a room. ;)

    Will definitely update when I make a decision. I figure probably another week or so.
     
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  4. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    After some years when I managed 20,000 people, eventually I downsized to only myself, doing all the content work and using copious help from internet searches and stringers/subcontractors. Life is delightful for me that way. I know precisely who to blame when there is a problem, and when all goes well. In addition there are fewer questions of corporate politics.
     
  5. LizzyDragon84
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    LizzyDragon84 Gold Member

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    I agree with jbcarioca- it sounds like you've already made the decision and perhaps just need a little affirmation to do it. I say take the new opportunity and don't look back.
     
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  6. Gargoyle
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    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

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    It's really a personality thing. Some people need to work in large environments and can't handle being by themselves, others of us are the opposite. Some people can do either comfortably.

    Make sure you're comfortable with the one-man thing, and remember, in that environment personal chemistry is critical- do you like the employer, and does he/she like you?
     
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  7. legalalien
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    legalalien Gold Member

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    As far as I'm concerned, you can always spin this change in a positive way on your resume, if you ever decide to go back to the corporate rat-race. Although, as others have already mentioned, the flexibility and freedom of working by yourself is addictive. Very addictive.

    I do congratulate you on having a choice of (what sounds like) two good opportunities.
     
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  8. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    I can't help thinking that the OP's age might factor into this decision. It can certainly matter if you decide after some time that you'd like to get back into the corporate world. OTOH, many use the one man show setup as a way to transition to part-time work and semi-retirement. Are you at a point in your career when a few more years in the corporate world is likely with luck to lead to a big promotion and a really fun job or choices of further opportunities? Or will some of the multi-function and big picture perspective you'll get in the one person situation help you to qualify for either the next logical step or a major step that you'd like to take?
     
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  9. aanswer

    aanswer Silver Member

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    I have a loooong way to go in the working environment. I'm in my mid 20s now, but have done fairly well for myself by pursuing what I like to do vs. the norm.

    I'm roughly 4 years away from probably one of the most prestigious jobs in the industry and hence my doubts as we to where to go. :)
     
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  10. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    Four years can be a long time in a job you don't like or that doesn't suit you. Do you really want "one of the most prestigious jobs in the industry" for the job itself as opposed for just for the prestige and money?
     
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  11. aanswer

    aanswer Silver Member

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    Do I want it? Actually, yes. And sadly the money increments from my current position to that job is less than ~40%, so it's definitely not about the money.

    At the end of the day -- the biggest decision I'm trying to make is life vs. work.
     
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  12. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    You do need to decide that now because whatever you decide now may end out being the pattern for the rest of your life. Work/life tradeoffs seem never to be so easily handled as the advice gurus suggest they are. I have several friends who opted for less work/more home and ended miserable and underemployed or not employed at all. Some others who opted the other extreme are equally miserabel, usually for other reasons. after 33 happy years with Mrs. jb I know the domestic part is hard work whether you travel a lot or not. One of my closest friends and his partner have been together about the same time and they have battled the same issues. i think everyone does.

    For those reasons, and more, I think MSPeconomist
    has good advice. Unhappiness always seems to be eternity, not matter how short the time actually is.

    If ever YMMV was said, in this case it is even more so. We all have advice, but it is your life and we haven't any idea how you really should decide.
     
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  13. SS255
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    SS255 Silver Member

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    I would take a long-term view. Will the job switch move you closer to your long-term career goals? If your long-term career goal is to occupy a corner office in a large corporation, you're better off staying where you are. If your long-term career goal is to start your own boutique company which capitalizes on your strengths and work experience, you would probably be wise to make the switch. Don't forget to consider your "total compensation" at both jobs. The trade-off for working as a corporate hack is that the benefits, bonuses, vacation pay and perks are usually very good at the higher levels. On the other hand, you give up a lot of freedom, flexibility, and possibly even job security.
     
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