Boeing Resumes 787 Dreamliner Production Flights

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by GoodBoy, Apr 19, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. Boeing resumes 787 Dreamliner production flights
    US aircraft manufacturer Boeing has taken another significant step towards getting its grounded 787 Dreamliner back into commercial service with the resumption of production flights.
    Production flights are functional check flights designed to validate that the technologically advanced airliner's systems are working correctly and effectively begin the delivery process.
     
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  2. euromannn
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    euromannn Gold Member

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    What company can spend approximately $800 Million on product repairs and have stock go up 20%?

    "
    The unprecedented setback of the grounding will cost Boeing more than $600 million just to pay for the labor and parts in developing, testing, certifying and retrofitting the fix, according to one Wall Street analyst’s estimate.
    Beyond that, it will undoubtedly owe compensation to airlines for lost revenue. That can’t be reliably estimated because some customers will take price breaks on future orders instead of cash."
    Add $60Million/month x 3 months = $180M in lost revenue for airlines for the 51 grounded planes.
    Add additional for late deliveries.
     
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  3. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

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    The same way World War II got the US/World economy to shake off the Great Depression Blues...
     
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  4. euromannn
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    euromannn Gold Member

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    So add the original 3 year delay for 787 airplane and then an additional 3 months for battery issues.

    Who said being late to the market resulted in loss of market share? Airlines are begging for the 787!
     
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  5. Seacarl
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    Seacarl Gold Member

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    The 787 can perform missions that no other airplane in its size can perform. It's in the 763/764 size category but can fly 77W length trips, and at lower costs.

    Not sure I understand that analogy. WWII restarted demand in the U.S. economy. Boeing has had plenty of demand and would have been better off without the grounding. In fact, they might have been able to make more progress on 77X and perhaps 787-9/10 if they hadn't had to divert resources to 787. 77X delays will hurt Boeing as they need it to compete with A350
     
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  6. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

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    What would be the effect on the economy of an infusion of $800M and what are the long-term implications for the bottom line a company that can do that? Investors liked the move. During WW II a lot of cash was infused to wage the war and in the long run, the US economy boomed as a result.
     
  7. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    As you imply, the grounding and the other problems, mostly electrical thus far, will cost Boeing, but they'll fade as issues just as B777 RR engines issues did, for the same reason. The airplane does just what you say, serves long thin routes profitably that are too expensive for B777 whatever model and too long for A330. They'll end out with a couple thousand or so of these over a decade and make a mint. As with the B747 introduction, many thought Boeing would suffer a fatal blow, and they nearly did, but it ended out being hugely profitable. This is a long term play and they're going to become more popular as maturity sets in. The A350 is larger, so is not a direct competitor for the smaller versions of B787. There's lots of room for both and for the B777X too.
     
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  8. Seacarl
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    Seacarl Gold Member

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    I agree, these issues won't be any lasting problem for the 787. The public won't remember them.
    The 787 will really occupy a unique position without any true competitor in the long-thin route category, and should still be competitive in shorter-thin.
    I don't think A350 can compete with B787. It will be A350 vs B777 family, and when A350 ships and until B77X comes out, it will be advantage to the A350. That will be the most competitive segment, with Airbus owning the A380 space and Boeing the B787 space.

    Unfilled? What wcan perform B757-sized TATL missions? Seems beyond A320neo and B737MAX
     

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