Boeing 777X Launch Details

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by jbcarioca, Apr 3, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    Aspire Aviation has an excellent evaluation of the large widebody twin market, specifically the B777X:
    http://www.aspireaviation.com/2013/03/28/boeing-777x-to-spark-mini-jumbo-war/?lang=en

    With almost no doubt this will be the next big news. The B777X is planned to have a folding wing, so that it can avoid Category F classification (B748 and A380) by reducing wing width on ground while still getting the benefits in the air.

    This will be a big success, almost certainly, but begs the question about if and when a B787-10 comes to be. It will also attack the A350-1000 from a higher capacity, shorter range side.
     
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  2. autolycus

    autolycus Gold Member

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    I don't know why, but I'm highly fascinated by folding wing designs. I've always thought the Vought Corsair was one of the most striking-looking of the WW2 aircraft, even if it wasn't as sleek as a P51--looks like a racecar in the sky--or the P38.
     
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  3. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    Based on everything I have read, as well as Boeing statements, the history of folding wing designs suggests the penalty is weight rather than maintenance or durability. After all they've worked well with fighters and carrier based aircraft that have far more punishing flying regimes than do airliners. I think it is a great idea, frankly, that allows many more airports to be used than would be possible were it to be Category F. Precisely the goals of a mini-jumbo! Almost all the characteristics of the plan seem to be based on what will be mature technologies when it is actually put in service. The engine changes...materially different challenges for GE.

    This makes me quite pleased because it will have a very robust large aircraft competition between several excellent products. Unlike some recent Boeing efforts it begins with a modern well-designed airframe, and has every reason to expect success with few disappointing surprises.
     
  4. euromannn
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    euromannn Gold Member

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    "Based on everything I have read, as well as Boeing statements, the history of folding wing designs suggests the penalty is weight rather than maintenance or durability." Beware of the media......a good source for info, right?
     
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  5. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    The Boeing B-50 (folding tail) and B-377(folding fins) had folding surfaces as do most naval aircraft designs. The B777 has/had a folding wing option that nobody ordered. I have no doubt at all that this technology is mature and reliable. Problems they'll have like all major derivatives, but the folding wing surfaces will not be among them IMHO.
     
  6. autolycus

    autolycus Gold Member

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    In fact, I can't find a single report of issues with the folding wings on the F/A-18 Hornet or SuperHornet or the Vought F4U Corsair, from two very different eras of aviation. F4U's saw significant action in a wide variety of conditions during WW2, and any problems associated with the folding wing would have been widely reported in the historical record. They are not mentioned alongside development issues associated with the advanced design of the aircraft and the relatively new concept of high performance carrier-based planes. The aircraft is indeed considered one of the gold standard fighters of the era, having flown in over 64,000 sorties during the war, most of which were actually USMC sorties flown from land bases--which resulted in them being referred to as "mudfighters". Oh, and the folding wing of the Corsair was one of the first to be folded through hydraulic power rather than a handcrank.

    The F/A-18 is still serving the US Navy and USMC today and has been in carrier-based and land-based service for 30 years. Again, no mentions of maintenance or reliability problems can be found online, and I have read nothing about any such problems in any of the historical records that I have read about carrier aviation. During Desert Storm alone, 174 US Navy and USMC Hornets flew a total of 9,385 sorties, nearly 54 sorties per plane. In other words, the folding wings can take a good beating without failing.
     
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  7. boondr

    boondr Gold Member

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    With a few exceptions most Navy/USMC carrier based aircraft have folding wings, the list of aircraft with them as an available feature far exceeds those with-out in regards to US navalised aircraft.
     
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