Boeing 767 STOL?

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by Newscience, Jan 18, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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  2. blackjack-21

    blackjack-21 Gold Member

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    They used to call these "standing starts" when the crew holds the brakes hard while they spool up the engines to their fullest before releasing the brakes and hoping for enough thrust to get off the ground in time. We've had a few of these thrillers, once in Antigua on a BWIA B707, and another when the AC B727 we had boarded in LAS for our flight back to YYZ on a very hot July afternoon with the temperatures over 100F, had to first remove some jet fuel because of five late boarding pax and their luggage, then did a standing start on LAS longest runway (over 12,000 feet) and I watched from our seat as the 11,000 foot marker had barely passed before we struggled off then circled the low mountain bowl twice around the city in order to gain enough altitude to get over the mountains for our trip home.

    Not good for the aircraft's brakes or engines, but I guess necessary if there's no other choice. Branson, MO. and the recent Kansas misadventure probably used this method to get off the ground.
     
  3. thesterlingtraveler

    thesterlingtraveler Gold Member

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    A similar technique is used departing SNA due to short runway and noise abatement during takeoff. Not sure if they go all the way up to full power, but pretty close to it.
     
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  4. satman40

    satman40 Gold Member

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    We use to do it when it rained hard and water was in the middle of the runway.,

    Love the grass strips.
     
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  5. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    With most cases of twins, especially the largest ones, power is normally increased after takeoff. Less power is used for takeoff itself because the limiting factor is potential loss of directional control if an engine is lost at the most critical point before rotation (called V1, or takeoff safety speed, the speed after which a takeoff will continue even if there is an engine failure). In the case of fairly short runways in densely populated areas, such as SAN and SAN, a different approach is used, a power reduction after takeoff. That is perfectly safe from a control perspective but in some cases such as these two, there is nearly zero forward visibility for the cockpit crew after the power reduction. That happens just before the aircraft, taking off typically westbound, pass over the beaches which have dense VFR traffic from helicopters and small airplanes. These two airports scare me senseless as a pilot, so I refuse to fly out of either one in any jet. Light aircraft or smaller turboprops I have no problem; visibility for them is usually just fine.

    Luckily there have been few midair incidents thus far. These procedures, I fear, will produce some sooner or later. The only safe times to fly large aircraft there, IMHO, are when the weather is really and and the small VFR craft are not plentiful. That, as we all know, happens there maybe 5-6 times per year at the most. There is the odd foggy morning as well but that burns off quickly. I flew from LGB and TOA for some years, with a variety of aircraft.Much flight instruction I did was focussed on the problems associated with all those delightful coastal airports and all the VFR traffic passing along the beaches. Famously, the LAX approaches also are inundated with VFR traffic (remember Cerritos?)
     
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