Bloomberg describes B787 certification history

Discussion in 'Travel Technology' started by jbcarioca, Jan 18, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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  2. sobore
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    That sure would be better news for Boeing!
     
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  3. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    There are now several reports saying similar things. GS Yuasa, however, has said it is far too early to say and the entire electrical system needs to be examined. BTW, they also are to supply lithium-ion batteries for the International Space Station.
    http://www.gs-yuasa.com/us/

    It is fascinating how many answers are appearing even in the absence of any knowledge. inevitable, I guess.
    I remember clearly the last grounding, the DC-10. Then the fault was clear and obvious, so redesign was required and done. This time the answer probably is not so simple, given all the electrical problems before and after certification.
     
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  4. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    Agree. The root cause of electrical issues tends not be so obvious. I would think most of the major kinks with the electrical system were flushed out during planning and design. If the entrie systems needs to be re-designed then the wrong people are working on this project.
     
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  5. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    The polemics have already started with criticism of the FAA for almost complete reliance on Boeing-supplied data (from whom might they have had such data, if not Boeing?) and on the G W Bush administration for minimizing FAA oversight. Obviously, in hindsight, there were problems and deficiencies among Boeing, FAA, Thales, Yuasa and one and on. Events make that a certainty. We do NOT know if there was trivialization of issues nor if something less wholesome played a role. The only things we know for certain are:
    1) The systems worked from one perspective. Nobody died nor had even a serious injury. Only a single person bruised on a slide in evacuation.
    2) The systems did not work well enough either in design, manufacture, installation, testing or maintenance or in some combination of those.

    That is what an investigation is for. IMHO the world will be well served, Boeing and airlines too, if there is no undue rush to begin flying again. We need to have a deliberate, comprehensive and rapid investigation so that the solutions are based on known facts. Objective, apolitical and factual.

    Airbus, Boeing, airlines, battery manufacturers, other airframers are all in the process of adapting li-ion technology. Yuasa even was chosen to supply the International Space Station with li-ion batteries. That suggests the hyperbolic reactions common to amateur interested parties should be toned down quickly. This is certainly NOT a case of Boeing is bad, just as wing root issues were not a sign that Airbus is. Thales has been beaten up a bit, also unreasonably IMHO. Almost every player in this is a major supplier to several other players.

    Finally, these are only my views. Without any doubt at all people screwed up. had they not we'd not be in this situation. The point, IMHO, ought to be for everyone to learn from this rather than to try to blame people. It is for that reason that it is an excellent idea for EASA and Airbus to learn from this (the A380 and the A350 have li-ion technology too!) just as Boeing has learned from Airbus travails with the A300, A320 and A330. Airbus learned too from the B737 and B777 issues. We all should be delighted that the industry is managing to learn so much this time without having killed anybody.

    Sorry about the lecture. The issues are too serious to be used as political weapons.
     
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  6. jbcarioca
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  7. sobore
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    Great Input and you are right, nobody has been seriously hurt or killed. If all interested parties can learn from this to further improve airline safety than the system is functioning. Boeing is not the demon here, they are certainly the MOST interested in getting this resolved, which soon I believe it will be.
     
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  8. TRAVELSIG
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  9. jbcarioca
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    If I have the information correct the Boston fire was in the rear battery, a smaller box, although the burned insides seem identical. This was labeled as the ANA Japan plane by FOX. I am not positive, though, just replying on the labeling by news people.
     
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  10. TRAVELSIG
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    Let's hope this is a situation indeed of a defective batch of batteries.

    I am sure Boeing and the FAA have one or two good teams preparing a real root cause analysis on this- still looking forward to testing out a new 787 soon personally. I hope the same people calling doom and gloom on the Boeing aircraft remember the recent mess also regarding the A380. The technical sophistication of the products really makes it improbable to have zero problems on a completely new launch product.
     
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