BlackBerry ex-exec deported for boozy tantrum on Air Canada flight

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by tcook052, Mar 20, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. tcook052
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    tcook052 Silver Member

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  2. slalom

    slalom Silver Member

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    .....well....I wouldn't judge him too harshly. His behavior was inexcusable, but heaven forbid I have one too many and do something that makes the papers.
     
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  3. Seacarl
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    Seacarl Gold Member

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    Sounds like Ambien mixed with booze was involved. Ambien can make people do bad things.

    Deporting the man from Canada seems overly harsh punishment. It doesn't say where his family lived but says he was a father of three.
     
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  4. tcook052
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    tcook052 Silver Member

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    As has been mentioned elsewhere while the article says "deported" it's also noted he was in Canada on a work permit so wonder if it wasn't an actual deportation order but rather his work permit was not renewed or was invalidated because of this incident.
     
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  5. Seacarl
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    I'm not sure that distinction was important to him or his family. Non-renewal of the work permit or visa is effectively a deportation
     
  6. tomh009
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    Legally quite different, though. And there is never a guarantee of work permit renewal, whereas permanent residence is, well, permanent.
     
  7. LETTERBOY
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    I really don't think anyone should feel sorry for this guy. He's an idiot, and deserves whatever negative consequences he may get as a result of this incident. I've got nothing against people who drink and if someone wants to have a few drinks, but if you drink to excess and act like a jackass, tough.
     
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  8. tcook052
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    As I understand the incident it wasn't so much an excess consumption of booze that triggered it but rather a mixing of booze with sleeping pills, though will grant you that such high powered exec.'s should reasonably be expected to know the dangers of mixing drugs & drink.

    Also interesting to note in the article the captain saying he'd been flying for 38 years.
     
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  9. NordsFan
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    Permanent residency status is indeed "permanent" unless status is revoked for one of the reasons listed in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, including being convicted of an indictable criminal offense. Some of the other reasons for revocation are being a "security risk" or having made false statements in the course of the application process.

    The first guy (work permit and temporary residency) is gone. The second guy (permanent residency status) may not be quite done with the system yet......he might also get the boot, along with his dependants.
     
  10. LETTERBOY
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    I would submit that ANYONE should be expected to know the dangers of mixing drugs & alcohol, or of drinking too much.
     
  11. Seacarl
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    Fair enough. But the punishment of $30,000, fired from job, and deported from Canada seems pretty harsh if it is a first offense.
     
  12. LETTERBOY
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    I agree it's harsh. It should be harsh. I wouldn't object if the fine were double or triple what it was, nor would I object if he served time behind bars. And I don't care if it's the guy's first offense, or second, or third, or his hundredth. If you do something like this once, they ought to throw the book at you. Go directly to jail, do not pass go, do not collect $200.
     
  13. Seacarl
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    I would have more compassion. It may have been an innocent, regrettable mistake. I avoid taking drugs of all types, but if he used Ambien, he may not have understood what it was going to do to him. We seem more lenient than this on many violent criminals.
     
  14. NordsFan
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    First offense or not, the guys put themselves in a "Lose, lose, lose" situation. Their behaviour onboard that flight resulted in three seperate levels of consequences:

    1- Employment: the behaviour in and off itself was sufficient to result in a "for cause" termination for both miscreants;

    2- Criminality: the gravity of the events was such that they were charged with various criminal offenses for which they were convicted; one part of the sentence included an order of restitution to Air Canada for costs incurred;

    3- Immigration: the guy who was here on a work permit lost his job at RIM, thus triggering the termination of the temporary residency permit that comes as an accessory to the work authorisation; no more job, no more right to live temporarily in Canada as a foreign national; in any event, the criminal convictions would also have triggered a review of his status in Canada as a foreign national, which is likely to also happen to the other guy who apparently holds permanent resident status; this status can be revoked and if so, the process would have it that the guy, and any dependants, would be inadmissible to remain in Canada, thus subject to "removal", either through voluntary "departure" or enforced "deportation".

    It's a serious, even grave, situation, especially for family membrs who may now have alot to lose too. But harsh ? No, not IMO.
     
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  15. 2by4

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    It sounds like some people have trouble with the concept of "Consequences for your actions" and not just a re-do.
     
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  16. tcook052
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    Meh, sorry but count me in the camp that feels okay with their being consequences for one's actions and doesn't see as this too "innocent" a mistake.
     
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  17. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    I think these guys should also be responsible for reasonable compensation to their fellow customers. How long was the delay caused by their actions?
     
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  18. Seacarl
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    I had a 6-hour delay on an A380 flight that was diverted because parents said their 3 year old child needed medicatl attention (turned our child was fine.) Missed onward connection and forced overnight. Do the parents owe compensation to 500 inconvenienced pax? And the airline for fuel dump? When you travel, stuff happens.
     
  19. tomh009
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    If you cause on accident on the 401, and block traffic for several hours, do you owe reasonable compensation to everyone who gets stuck in the traffic jam behind the accident?
     
  20. tomh009
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    I wouldn't have thought this would be a severe enough crime to be considered an indictable offence and get permanent residency revoked. Indictable offences include murder, acts of terrorism, robbery, drug trafficking, robbery, treason, and some sexual assaults. This doesn't quite seem to fit into the same bucket. Of course I'm not a lawyer, though.

    The work permit situation was clear-cut as the guy lost his employment and thus the work permit.
     
  21. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    Apples, bananas and oranges.
     
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  22. LETTERBOY
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    You should, if you caused the accident by drinking & driving, or mixing drugs with alcohol.
     
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