bin Laden dead: Airport Security Impact

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by Captain Oveur, May 1, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. Captain Oveur
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    Captain Oveur Gold Member

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    1. I'm glad I'm not flying this week; I'm confident the TSA will ratchet things up given the news of bin Laden's demise.

    2. Ironic, entering this forum, the total post count was 911.
     
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  2. DesertRose
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    Surely this will de-escalate the threat level and we will be at "Green". :rolleyes:
     
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  3. uggboy
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    uggboy Gold Member

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    Now the world can be a better place again, security can speed up in ways we have not known for years!;)
     
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  4. MSPeconomist
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    I doubt it. I predict this will be used as a "reason" for yet more money for TSA and more intrusive security theater.
     
  5. MSPeconomist
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    My local TV news is reporting enhanced security checks in airports like NYC but not locally.
     
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  6. milchap
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    milchap Gold Member

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    Terrorists will attempt to avenge the death of their model.....and probably not soon....
    We can expect increased vigilence for a while.
     
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  7. goalie
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    goalie Gold Member

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    I'll report back later today/tomorrow as goalie-parents are flying UA BOS-SFO today. Ought to fun as the TSA at BOS has always been, shall we say, interseting ;)
     
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  8. goalie
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    goalie Gold Member

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    Just a little bit, huh? ;)
     
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  9. below sea level
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    below sea level Silver Member

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    I don't think it's just revenge we have to worry about. Whoever replaces Bin Laden at the top of that organisation is going to want to assert their authority at some point to ensure they stay there. On the bright side, that person will probably take some time to organise things.

    The real security threat at the moment will be amateur sympathisers acting independently like last year's Time Square bomber. They won't wait and will be harder to predict.

    Either way, don't expect the threat level to go down. Ever.
     
  10. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    Just my opinion but these maniacs have always been around and will continue to be. So on a daily basis everyone has to do their part to insure safety. As BSL stated above "don't expect the threat level to go down. Ever." , makes sense.
     
  11. uggboy
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    Isn't this sad somehow?:(
     
  12. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    very much so.
     
  13. DestinationDavid
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    DestinationDavid Milepoint Guide

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    Flying out of ORD on Saturday AM, so it'll be interesting to see what happens.

    That being said I feel like our security situation is very much like the mythological Greek monster Hydra. For every head you cut, a power struggle will occur in the vacuum, and two heads will come back.
     
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  14. tw116
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    i'm flying out of dfw in a few hours. hoping the security lines won't be too slow. we'll see.
     
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  15. jmrich1432
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    jmrich1432 Silver Member

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    Flew out of TPA this morning (into PHL), nothing noticable on either side. We did have to return to the gate as a pax had a heart attack before takeoff. Other than that, nothing out of the oridinary (for TPA).

    I supposed it may take a few days. The State Dept. warning for US citizens travelling abroad did not go out until after we had taken off so maybe it was just too early/too soon to see a difference. I guess I will find out on Thursday!
     
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  16. MSPeconomist
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    Please report back.
     
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  17. yaffa
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  18. 2soonold
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    A precedent has been set. Airliners were deliberately flown into buildings. That precedent was not set by the passengers on those airliners, nor the people inside those buildings.
    Until such time as a new precedent may be set to replace the existing precedent, I would not entertain the hope that our annoying airport security would significantly change for the better.
     
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  19. DesertRose
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    I agree with your premises but not your conclusions. They have always been around. How many terrorist attacks on airplanes were there in the 1980s? So what has changed? Is the threat level actually higher, or are you just hyper-aware of it?

    With the 24-hour news cycle, every threat becomes magnified and distorted. I don't expect the threat level to go down, but I blame that on the people who make money off of scaring and terrifying the average citizen, rather than any significant risk.

    What exactly do you think everyone should do on a daily basis to "insure(sic) safety"? First, of all, it's not possible to ensure safety, so the best you can hope for is partial risk mitigation. Secondly, the goal of terrorism is to enact change using fear. If we change our way of life, surrendering our freedoms and peace of mind because we are afraid, the terrorists win.
     
  20. mikeef
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  21. DesertRose
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    I would argue that United 93 was the new precedent.

    As soon as we enacted measure to prevent airlines from being flown into buildings (airline policy change that pilots no longer surrender to terrorist demands, reinforced cockpit doors, United 93-style passenger awareness) airport security should have been reduced to reflect pre-9/11 security levels.

    The increased risk has been eliminated, yet we are increasingly paranoid about risks that have existed since the dawn of commercial aviation. Why? http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/01/nate_silver_on.html

    I will be flying to London later this week, and I will report on any changes from my trip last month.
     
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  22. mikeef
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    Bingo. Every time someone tells me that all this security is worth the minimal risk, I ask them why we don't all drive 20 MPH. Still waiting for the first good answer.

    The Availability Heuristic is one of my all-time favorite heuristics.

    Mike
     
  23. Captain Oveur
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    Captain Oveur Gold Member

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    For the first few years of its existence, the TSA did not want to rely upon passengers as being a level of defense. Now, passengers are in the list of "layers" the TSA touts (imagine, we're all treated like criminals at the checkpoint, yet we're a TSA layer).

    Part of the TSA's job is to keep everyone scared, especially the infrequent flier. Public perception of The Boogeyman is what keeps the money flowing to the TSA, and there's no way in hell they're going to relinquish that on their own.
     
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  24. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    1970
    • February 21: A bomb explodes in the rear of Swissair Flight 330, causing it to crash near Zürich, killing 38 passengers and all nine crew members. The attack was carried out by Palestinian terrorist group PFLP
    • March 31: Japan Airlines Flight 351, carrying 131 passengers and 7 crew from Tokyo to Fukuoka, is hijacked by nine members of the Japanese Red Army group. 23 passengers were freed at Fukuoka Airport, mainly children or old aged. 108 passengers and all crew members with Red Army group left Fukuoka, bound for Gimpo Airport, near Seoul. Three days later, Red Army group asks to be flown to North Korean capital Pyongyang, before leaving from Seoul, 103 passenger and crew hostages are freed, and nine Red Army group members surrendered to North Korean authorities.
    • September 6: Coordinated hijacking of four airliners. One hijacking is foiled in midair and two planes are diverted to Jordan’s Dawson Field. NicaraguanSandinista hijacker Patrick Argüello was killed and all passengers were freed after negotiated release of captured hijacker Leila Khaled and three PFLP prisoners. The following day a fifth aircraft was also hijacked. See Dawson's Field hijackings, Black September in Jordan.
    1972
    1973
    1974
    1975
    • December: Carlos the Jackal and his rebels attack OPEC headquarters in Vienna and take over 60 hostages - mostly they were OPEC countries' leaders. On December 22, the hostages and rebels are transported in a DC-9 to Algiers where 30 hostages were freed; the plane was then flown to Tripoli, Libya, where more hostages were freed before flying back to Algiers where the remaining hostages were freed and the rebels were granted asylum.
    • December 29: Bomb explodes at New York's LaGuardia Airport, killing eleven and injuring 75. No arrests ever made in this case and the reason for this attack remains unknown.
    1976
    1977
    • October 13: Lufthansa flight LH 181 was hijacked by a group of four members of PFLP and taken to Mogadishu, Somalia; it was later released after a rescue operation launched by GSG 9 commando group.
    1979
    1981
    • May 16: One dead in an explosion in the toilets at the Pan Am terminal at New York's JFK airport. The bombing is claimed by the Puerto Rican Resistance Army.[1]
    1982
    1983
    1984
    1985
    • June 14: TWA Flight 847skyjacking, Hezbollah, see FBI Most Wanted Terrorists. Terrorists take passengers of an Athens-Rome flight hostage, murdering US Navy Seaman, Robert Stethem.
    • June 22: Air India Flight 182 is blown up by a bomb put onboard the flight from Canada to India by unknown terrorists. All 329 people on board, most of them Canadian citizens, are killed. At the time, the deadliest terrorist attack ever, and still the deadliest act of terrorism in Canadian history. A second Air India flight from Canada was targeted on the same day, but the bomb exploded at Narita Airport, in the luggage outside the aircraft, killing two baggage handlers, bringing the total death toll of the act to 331.
    • November 23: EgyptAir Flight 648 hijacked by Abu Nidal group, flown to Malta, where Egyptian commandos storm plane; 60 are killed by gunfire and explosions.
    1986
    • March 31: Mexicana Flight 940 explode, following crash in mountain area, Maravatio, Michoacan, Mexico, which claim responsibility for Arab Revolutionary Brgades and the Egyptian Revolutionaries terrorist groups. All 167 passengers and crews are fatalities in the crash.
    • April 2: TWA Flight 840 bombed on approach to Athens airport; four passengers (all of them American), including an infant, are killed.
    • May 3: A bomb explodes aboard a Sri Lankan airliner in Colombo, Sri Lanka, killing 21 and injuring 40
    • September 5: Pan Am Flight 73, an American civilian airliner, is hijacked; 22 people die when plane is stormed in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 359 passengers and crew survive. The attack was carried out by Muslim extremists and was possibly sponsored by Libya.
    • September 14: A bomb exploded in outside of Ginpo Airport, suburb of Seoul, South Korea, kills five and injures twenty-nine, which responsible for North Korean agents.
    • December 25: Iraqi Airways Flight 163 is hijacked, and 60 passengers and 3 crew members die when it crashes after a hand grenade is detonated in the cockpit. The pro-Iranian group "Islamic Jihad" claimed responsibility.
    1988
    1989
     
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  25. Dovster
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    There is one tremendous difference between all the examples you cited and 9/11 -- in the previous hijackings/bombings the only ones at risk were the people in the aircraft. That automatically reduces the potential number of casualties.

    On 9/11 over 3000 people, most of whom weren't even thinking of flying, were killed. The stakes immediately went up tremendously. That is the reason why, today, if there is even a suspected hijacking fighter jets are immediately scrambled -- they are there to shoot down the passenger jet, even if it means killing everyone on board, if it avoids the risk of the plane being smashed into a city.
     

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