Best Place To Buy Memory

Discussion in 'Travel Technology' started by misman, Mar 6, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. misman
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    misman Gold Member

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    I have inherited my wife's old HP laptop (I bought her a new one.) I will eventually upgrade it from Vista 64 to Windows 7, but want to upgrade the memory before I do that from 4GB (2 x 2GB) to 8GB (2 x 4GB) first. I know how to replace the memory sticks, but have never actually bought it.

    Any recommendations where to buy the memory sticks?

    For what it is worth, I need 2 x DDR2 SODIMM 200pin 4096MB.
     
  2. gobluetwo
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    gobluetwo Silver Member

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    I've always liked Newegg for their prices and service. Crucial makes good products, but are definitely pricier.
     
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  3. willyroo
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    willyroo Active Member

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    Ahh memory...the increase in response from your PC by increasing to 8Gb will be almost unmeasurable. I have a quad core desktop with W7x64 and couldn't tell the difference from 4Gb to 8Gb.

    Want a real increase in speed? For the marginal increase in price over RAM, why not a nice new SSD with your tasty W7?
     
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  4. Freddie Listo
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    Freddie Listo Gold Member

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    I've bought from Crucial, via the web, and the dreaded Fry's, in person. Happy with both.

    Edited to add: Crucial's web site has a downloadable software tool that will scan your machine to determine what you have and make recommendations for compatible memory upgrades. It was kind of cool to read the results of the scan. Not sure why . . . :)

    www.crucial.com
     
  5. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    I assume you verified that you actually run out of physical memory in your normal use of the machine and it is swapping? If not, that's what I'd do first before spending money on more memory. And I second willyroo's suggestion of considering an SSD if you're looking for a significant performance boost.

    As for where I buy memory... usually at Fry's. There are several here in the Bay Area, so it's convenient for me to go there. Prices are typically not bad and I have had no problems returning memory when it didn't work in the machine that I tried to upgrade (they used to be more finicky in the past, IME).
     
  6. KyRoamer
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    KyRoamer Gold Member

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    Buy local someplace with a good return policy if price is anywhere close. To save under $10 doesn't justify mail order. Remember postage in calculating savings.
     
  7. jason8612
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    jason8612 Gold Member

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    So do I. Good prices, good shipping
     
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  8. DenverBrian
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    DenverBrian Silver Member

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    Go to crucial.com, get your exact memory specs, then go to www.pricewatch.com and find the lowest price there.
     
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  9. AlaskaAir738
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    AlaskaAir738 Silver Member

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    I have bought from Crucial on several occasions and have no complaints.
     
  10. I would use Crucial's memory finder to find specifically what kind of RAM you need, and then use Pricewatch/eBay to find the cheapest RAM.

    Although, unless you're taxing the 4GB's you currently have there isn't going to be a major boost in performance, maybe 3-6%. It's somewhat anecdotal but as reference I have a laptop with 8GB's and a desktop with 16GB's, In my case I regularly use the RAM with Virtual Machines or simply daily usage habits.

    The SSD would be the better 'bang for the buck' but I doubt your wife had a desktop replacement laptop with room for two drives so you could have Windows live on the SSD and your data live on a mechanical drive. Three of the four computers I own have this configuration and the results are nothing short of fantastic!
     
  11. Mul
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    Mul Silver Member

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    I recommend using Crucial's memory finder so you get the right type of memory. I usually buy it from newegg.com
     
  12. DenverBrian
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    DenverBrian Silver Member

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    For a laptop, one "in between" solution is a hybrid hard drive like the Seagate Momentus. Seems to provide the best of all worlds. 500GB for $100.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148591
     
  13. techguru
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    techguru Silver Member

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    I've always liked Newegg as well, but make sure your memory matches exactly.
    For example it could DDR3 1333 timing 9-9-9-24
    The timing you want to make sure is the optimal for your machine, and is they are matched pair.

    For anyone who cares:
    in the timing for example 9-9-9-24

    First 9 = CAS (tcl) Column Address Select timing -- it controls the amount of time in cycles between sending a reading command and the time to act on it. Lower number = better.

    Second 9 = tRCD timing or RAS to CAS timing in cycles for issuing active, read, and write commands

    Third 9 = tRP or Row Precharge Time. Timing between active command and the read / write of the next bank.

    The Last 24 = Min RAS time. This is the minimum time a row is active for precharge and deactivated. The lower this number the better, but a number too low can lead to corruption.

    Optimal timing for your machine is key for performance, and making sure your memory is matched is usually preferred. Faster memory such as DDR3 versus DDR may have slower timings, but in generally run at faster speeds like DDR3 1333 versus DDR400 (which might have faster timings).

    Just make sure you buy matched memory that meet specs, and carry a lifetime memory. You'll be fine -- Phil
     
  14. doc
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    doc Silver Member

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    FWIW, I'd do the W7 UG 1st. You may well find that is all you'll need..
    I'b go with 8 if I was keeping Vista ;)
    W7 in practice requires half the memory of Vista to run well in my experience.
    Good luck :)
     
  15. FrankieC

    FrankieC Silver Member

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    Another option to buy memory online is www.buymemory.com. They have been around quite a while as McDonald & Associates and has always had good customer support, good prices, and makes it easy to look up what type of memory your computer requires. They also sell other memory related accessories, like hard drives, media cards, etc.
     
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