Bali...typhoid vaccine needed?

Discussion in 'Asia' started by cheryld, Sep 4, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. cheryld
    Original Member

    cheryld Silver Member

    Messages:
    701
    Likes Received:
    919
    Status Points:
    795
    Hi, thanks again for the helpful advice in planning our upcoming trip to Hong Kong/Bali! We are about 3 weeks out and now I am looking at the CDC website. Even though we are staying at hotels on Bali, do we need a typhoid vaccine? Also, did anyone bring an antibiotic with (like Cipro or Z-max)? I think I should have gone by the member name of 'nervous nelly' :)
    Thanks in advance, Cheryl
     
    jwsky likes this.
  2. jwsky
    Original Member

    jwsky Silver Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    443
    Status Points:
    520
    Ask your doctor.
    My doctor thinks I should keep it (typhoid vac) up to date regardless of travel. It comes in a combo with some others. It is always nice to have some antibiotics in the med kit with the first aid and other over the counters.
     
    CherylD and HaveMilesWillTravel like this.
  3. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,504
    Likes Received:
    20,199
    Status Points:
    16,520
    CherylD likes this.
  4. cheryld
    Original Member

    cheryld Silver Member

    Messages:
    701
    Likes Received:
    919
    Status Points:
    795
    Thanks, I had already looked at the CDC website. I called my doctor. They said I should go to a travel clinic to see what shots I would need. In addition, I was told not to drink the water at all, no coffee, tea, etc. (unless it is bottled or made from bottled water) and don't eat any fruits or uncooked vegetables. Seriously? :-o
     
    marcwint55 likes this.
  5. LarryInNYC

    LarryInNYC Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    2,797
    Status Points:
    1,445
    Not seriously. Tea and coffee are fine. I wouldn't drink the tap water, but in many places they're using carboys of purified water in cooking and preparing drinks. On our recent trip (adults and two children 13 and 11 in Bali, Myanmar, Cambodia) we were pretty loose about what we ate and drank. In particular, we had plenty of fruit shakes and smoothies (which use ice) and sometimes even ate raw vegetables (and lots and lots of fruit which we peeled ourselves -- don't miss the salaks in Bali). We did have what I would call minor stomach discomfort for a couple of days, but that's possible anyway because the microflora are so different.

    Most doctors will probably recommend you're up to date with typhoid as well as a variety of other vaccinations. We got the boosters as suggested. We also took Malarone (an anti-malarial). Most important is to avoid mosquito bites to whatever extent you can.
     
    CherylD and HaveMilesWillTravel like this.
  6. estnet
    Original Member

    estnet Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,749
    Likes Received:
    2,117
    Status Points:
    1,270
    In third world countries a good rule is "boil it, peel it, or forget it". Bottled water is freely available and cheap. I'd be leery of salads unless you know what kind of water is used to rinse it since a friend of mine came back from Bali with a nasty intestinal parasite.
    OTOH I've been many times and never been sick - but I'm aware of what and where I'm eating (and I eat at lots of local places). There is some great food (esp. around Ubud).
    Avoiding mosquito bites is REALLY good advice (repellant esp on clothes, long sleeves, etc at sunset), and anti-malarials are good when needed (eg going to a malarial endemic area. They are of no use for other nasties like dengue fever ), but Malarone has some really nasty side effects so do check with a competent physician.
    NO medication protects perfectly so even if you take it still try your best to avoid bites.
    Washing your hands A LOT and being careful of others hygiene is probably the most important since cleanliness standards are somewhat different - I saw a lady in the market in Ubud simply lift her skirt to urinate in a ditch - hope she wasn't then serving food.
     
    CherylD likes this.
  7. marcwint55

    marcwint55 Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,517
    Likes Received:
    4,573
    Status Points:
    2,570
    We were there in September. We did not need typhoid shots and we ate lots of fruit. I would advise care if you go to the monkey forest in Ubud, as I saw a few people that were bitten by the monkees. Don't carry anything that they will want to take from you as they are very aggressive. We did eat in restaurants outside of the hotels and I did not drink tap water in any of them, but I had no concern drinking tea from boiled water. We spent a week there and had no problems with anything that we ate or drank.
     
    CherylD and HaveMilesWillTravel like this.
  8. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,504
    Likes Received:
    20,199
    Status Points:
    16,520
    I second that. I barely survived the visit to the monkey forest. One of the monkeys jumped on my wife's head and I took a couple of photos while our guide tried to shoo the monkey away.
     
    CherylD and marcwint55 like this.
  9. LarryInNYC

    LarryInNYC Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    2,797
    Status Points:
    1,445
    Yes, take no food at all into the Monkey Forest. They will find it, and they're not shy. Fortunately so many other people buy the bananas and try to hide them under their shirts that the monkeys will leave you alone if you have nothing of interest to them. Plus, you'll have plenty of entertainment.
     
  10. joanek
    Original Member

    joanek Silver Member

    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    208
    Status Points:
    445
    Very weird, I was just asking the same inoculation question yesterday. Better to be safe than sorry...and I usually go along with the ""boil it, peel it, or forget it" advice. On the advice of an MD years ago, I started taking probiotics a month before traveling to India. I had no issues over the three weeks there, and (while staying away from any water that didn't come from a sealed bottle) did eat some street food. I've stuck with that regime when traveling to other potentially iffy (gut-wise) areas.
     
    CherylD likes this.
  11. secretsea18
    Original Member

    secretsea18 Gold Member

    Messages:
    7,729
    Likes Received:
    44,584
    Status Points:
    14,020
    Malaria is not that much of a problem in Bali. However Dengue Fever is much more of a problem. Both are transmitted by mosquitos. Dengue has no treatment at all, thus avoidance of getting bitten is key. Bring DEET containing repellents.
    I have been to Bali many times and do not bring any malaria meds nor get any special shots to visit Bali only, but if you go to other Indonesian islands, you will definitely need malarone and possibly other vaccinations like hepatitis A.
    Best to do whatever makes you feel safer in this regard, but remember that a travel clinic is in the business of selling shots and exotic meds (Malarone is very expensive) and likely will give you everything that the CDC lists even if it is a tiny risk.
     
    CherylD likes this.
  12. cheryld
    Original Member

    cheryld Silver Member

    Messages:
    701
    Likes Received:
    919
    Status Points:
    795
    Thanks everyone for the great advice! We have the first 2 in the HepA/B series done, and my doctor will not do anything other than send me to the travel clinic. She also said I have to have the typhoid 2 weeks prior. Based on the advice here, I'm not going to sweat it if we don't get it done and just be careful. I appreciate the insight given in this thread from members who have been there...thank you so much for responding with your experiences! :)
     

Share This Page