Asiana-214 Pilot was in Training

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by MX, Jul 7, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. MX

    MX Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,215
    Likes Received:
    4,805
    Status Points:
    2,545
    The plane was too slow on approach, but did not abort the landing. It's not clear yet if the pilot's inexperience with B777 was a significant factor.
    Further details here.
     
  2. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    The flight was supposedly double crewed due to it's length, so it seems strange to me that the more experienced 777 pilot would stay in the rest seat during the landing.
     
    jbcarioca and MX like this.
  3. MX

    MX Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,215
    Likes Received:
    4,805
    Status Points:
    2,545
    According to tv news reports, the crashed plane was recently upgraded to 16g seats. It was likely the silver lining that ultimately saved most of the passengers. I wonder if the two killed teenagers were properly strapped in for landing.
     
    jwsky, flyforawg and jbcarioca like this.
  4. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    Now it's confusing. Reports on CNN make it sound like the co-pilot during the landing was in fact the trainee's training instructor. If this is true, who is considered to be responsible? The trainee, who is a fully licensed commercial pilot, or the trainer?
     
    MX and jbcarioca like this.
  5. milchap
    Original Member

    milchap Gold Member

    Messages:
    27,667
    Likes Received:
    148,066
    Status Points:
    20,020
    I am waiting for preliminary NTSB report on human factor.......
     
    jbcarioca likes this.
  6. jwsky
    Original Member

    jwsky Silver Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    443
    Status Points:
    520
    good point! Not that long ago, a crash like this would have killed a lot of people. Maybe the head lines should read "government regulations save hundreds in plane crash".
     
    MX and jbcarioca like this.
  7. jbcarioca
    Original Member

    jbcarioca Gold Member

    Messages:
    17,507
    Likes Received:
    57,455
    Status Points:
    20,020
    From the FAA perspective the Pilot in Command would have been the one being called a "trainee". Actually he was (is) not a trainee as such, but a senior pilot being supervised during his first commercial flights as Captain in a new aircraft type for him. I suspect there was a language issue taht caused taht to be called "trainee". However, a "training pilot", acting as supervisor of another without the mandated experience, will also be deemed to be responsible. So both of them, plus the copilot will be held responsible because they all shared responsibility for safety of flight despite their differences in rank. Simply stated, it would be most surprising for any other the three to retain their pilots licences if the reports so far are accurate.
     
    MSPeconomist, jwsky, MX and 1 other person like this.
  8. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    So there were three pilots in the cockpit at the time of the crash? I had understood that the trainer was also acting as the copilot while the other two generic pilots on board (presumably the pilot and copilot for the takeoff) were in the designated crew rest area during the landing.
     

Share This Page