Arbitration favors Air Canada in Pilot negotiations

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by canucklehead, Jul 30, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. canucklehead
    Original Member

    canucklehead Gold Member

    Messages:
    5,895
    Likes Received:
    22,059
    Status Points:
    11,070
  2. The pilots are already whining that the award is politically motivated. These guys deserve to be decertified in my opinion.
     
    LETTERBOY likes this.
  3. tcook052
    Original Member

    tcook052 Silver Member

    Messages:
    518
    Likes Received:
    637
    Status Points:
    695
  4. canucklehead
    Original Member

    canucklehead Gold Member

    Messages:
    5,895
    Likes Received:
    22,059
    Status Points:
    11,070
    LETTERBOY likes this.
  5. If the pilots try any job actions they will be slapped down pretty hard this time because the contract was done by an impartial mediator and no matter how they slice and dice things they got to make their best offer which was not accepted. The fact that AC can now move forward with their LCC and have "sub contracted" pilots fly puts the AC pilots in an even more precarious position. In my opinion it finally levels the playing field.

    As a SE quickly approaching 2MM I'm not sure I specifically look forward to next steps in the evolution of our airline but time will tell. I suspect and hope they will keep mainline services pretty much as thye are but there will be the LCC flying along side on many routes or AC will designate some mainline routes that don't make money as LCC routes only.
     
    LETTERBOY and canucklehead like this.
  6. mtlfire

    mtlfire Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    1,821
    Status Points:
    1,120
    I would imagine that the continued fight will be more on the legal front than on a pressure tactic front.

    In 2002 the BC government legislated work conditions via Bill 29 in the health sector. The unions contested it based on a Canadian charter violation and that the freedom of association should also include the freedom of collective bargaining. They lost through the various court systems finally ending up in the Supreme Court of Canada in 2007 where the court sided with the unions and ruled that various sections of the law were a charter violation as it removed the possibility to freely bargain their working conditions.

    Granted, it wasn't the exact same scenario as AC and the union were forced into last best offer arbitration and both parties had a chance to present and defend their positions. However the end result is similar; the contract wasn't freely negotiated.

    Its unfortunate the membership didn't side with the past union executive that negociated what both parties felt was a fair conclusion. Ultimately the only people that risk to come out ahead, as with most labor conflicts, are the lawyers.

    Alas. I'm not a lawyer ;)
     
    canucklehead likes this.
  7. This new LCC will most likely be a joint venture with some foreign non union carrier and AC may not be the beneficial controlling partner to ensure it has a "firewall" of protection from its unions. The mediator has "de facto" agreed that AC be allowed to set this new venture up in that manner.
     
    canucklehead likes this.
  8. canucklehead
    Original Member

    canucklehead Gold Member

    Messages:
    5,895
    Likes Received:
    22,059
    Status Points:
    11,070
    any speculations on the foreign carrier of choice?
     
  9. mtlfire

    mtlfire Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    1,821
    Status Points:
    1,120
    Only issue would be if the law that ordered arbitration was decided unconstitutional. This would likely render the decision obsolete.

    But we're years (and legal fees) away from hearing a final decision on that one.
     
    LETTERBOY and canucklehead like this.
  10. igloocoder
    Original Member

    igloocoder Silver Member

    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    390
    Status Points:
    520
    Mexicana?

    Seriously though...I suspect the LCC will be primarily used for the so called sun routes. Does AC then partner with an airline from the Mexico/Caribbean region in the hopes of local cost savings (i.e. facilities/staff already in place)? Or do they look elsewhere and base the decision on corporate/financial strength?
     
  11. igloocoder
    Original Member

    igloocoder Silver Member

    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    390
    Status Points:
    520
    I'm baffled at what they pilots really thought was going to happen. They suggested (jointly with AC I understand) the arbitrator. They knew they were going to either win or lose since the arbitrator was to choose between the last offers by both parties. They knew. So what caught them so much by surprise that they're now up in arms? Were they that sure the arbitrator was going to pick their proposal?
     
    LETTERBOY likes this.
  12. tcook052
    Original Member

    tcook052 Silver Member

    Messages:
    518
    Likes Received:
    637
    Status Points:
    695
    It's just the usual kvetching and I'd been more surprised had they accepted the decision without the usual whinning.
     
    LETTERBOY likes this.
  13. mtlfire

    mtlfire Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    1,821
    Status Points:
    1,120
    Air Canada labour settlement could lead to wider industry shake-up


    Shares in Air Canada rallied Tuesday after an arbitrator sided with the country’s largest carrier in its lengthy and bitter labour dispute with its pilots.
    The new five-year contract, which was selected in final-offer arbitration, is expected to have an impact not only on Air Canada but could shake up the industry as a whole, analysts said.

    Cameron Doersken, a National Bank Financial analyst, said he viewed the decision by the arbitrator late Monday as positive news for Air Canada.
    “This is the last union contract to be settled, ending a tumultuous period of labour instability for Air Canada,” he said. “The new agreement opens the door for substantive changes to Air Canada’s business, including the establishment of [a new low-cost carrier], more regional flying and potentially major fleet changes.”
    [...]
     
    LETTERBOY likes this.

Share This Page