Airplane etiquette

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by guinnessxyz, Nov 2, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/t...etiquette.html?nl=travel&emc=edit_tl_20131102

    Like most experienced travelers, Dawn Bozulich, a Los Angeles businesswoman who flies about once a week, has her own mental list of passenger infractions, like loud talking (“Not everybody cares that they got wasted last night and how many Red Bulls they drank,” she said) and “gate lice,” a term frequent fliers use for travelers who besiege the gate long before their zone is called. “Just because you see the door open and people deplaning, that is not your cue to get up and stand around the boarding area,” Ms. Bozulich said. “Just don’t do it. And everyone says, ‘I have priority access.’ Everyone has priority access. It doesn’t mean anything.”
     
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  2. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    The comment section is quite entertaining. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  3. blackjack-21

    blackjack-21 Gold Member

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    Long time ago (yeah I'm really that old) people were more polite and used some common sense and respect in dealing with other people. In today's hurry up and me-me world, it seems that common sense and common decency have fallen by the wayside. Shame, as it's taken some of the fun out of flying (this is a FF board after all) and so many other things. No time to think or "give a damn" about others who may be affected by your actions.
     
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  4. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    I don't mind the screaming baby in the parenting aisle; my noise-cancelling headphones block that out. It's the insensitive yappers on their cell phones up until the minute the plane departs and the FA gives them the evil eye to the back-on-the-phone-just-as-loud the moment we hit the tarmac. My last flight had me weighing the penalties of either punching the guy or smashing his phone.

    I remember one flight distinctly from London. A mom was traveling with her four kids and her nanny, one child being an infant. I had booked the window seat in that aisle without worry as my headphones get me through anything. I arrived at my seat, double-checked the numbers overhead, and kindly informed her that one of them was in my seat. She proceeded to berate me about when I booked my ticket, when did I request the window seat, etc. as she expected the entire row of 3 x 5 x 3 to be all hers for her family and employee. I informed her I had booked my flight and chosen my seat months earlier, and if she had a problem she could take it to a FA. She did, and I remained in my seat. Long flight (10 hours) to be a sourpuss. After about 5 hours she finally apologized. I waved her off and went to sleep, baby screaming and all, because I couldn't even hear it. :cool:

    The arrogance and entitlement bugs me when I go so far out of my way to be polite, patient, and respectful of the people around me. I never, ever, have reclined my seat as a courtesy to those behind me regardless of my cabin on every single flight I have ever taken in my life. Some people really make you just have to grit your teeth and resist the urge to flush them down with the blue juice.
     
  5. ConsultingChris

    ConsultingChris Silver Member

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    I am under the belief that people's intelligence drops between 20 and 40 percent when they travel. Spacial reasoning is also vastly diminished based on my observations of how people don't understand the effect of coming to a complete stop in the middle of a busy terminal walkway, trying to put a 26" bag into a 23" space, and trying to cram 300 lbs of themselves into a space not designed for such a load.
     
  6. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    Common sense isn't so common. I'm one of those people that only travel with a tiny carry-on or check my luggage as a courtesy. Add in the gate lice that although they can't board until the last group, they will do their best to flood the boarding area and force you to walk around them. If I didn't have priority boarding (and a while back I didn't), I'd sit in my seat or hang back until my group was called. Not all people are like this, but it's hard to ignore when it's so obvious sometimes.

    I smiled when reading your post because it's true. I'm such a patient traveler, never swayed by a missed connection or having the airline put me up in a hotel because their plane was late getting me to DFW and caused me to miss the last flight out to London for the night. I figure I can either get pissed and stress myself out, or enjoy the free night in a nice hotel and get to my destination in the end anyway, since I always pad my flights with an extra day before and after to deal with such delays (often needed for overseas flights). I often have to attend events scheduled in different countries at very specific times and dates, and missing them would be a major issue. My padded days allow me to keep my cool, but pax compassion, empathy, and even simple self-awareness seem to be at an all-time low.

    P.S. I never board a plane without bringing the crew a treat, often a hard-to-find-outside-of-mardi-gras-season king cake (which has to be special ordered locally days in advance in the off season) or chocolates if flying from Europe to home. It's a small, inexpensive gesture, but too many times I have heard, "Wow, I've never gotten anything from a passenger before! Thanks so much." A little kindness goes a long way with passengers and crew members. On one flight the king cake I brought was way too big for the crew, and they let me cut it up into slivers and offer it to the pax.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
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  7. Betty Boop

    Betty Boop Gold Member

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    Some good advice which should be common sense. BTW I will be in your fair city in about 2 weeks.

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
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  8. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    O.K., the comments on this page are so good that I could write a huge entry here to describe the many inconveniences of travelling long-haul flights in the steerage compartment. But, in the event that some of the folks here haven't yet seen it, this video from SNL captures a few of the agonies of "flying the bus" today. Enjoy! :) See:

    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/airport/n41324/
     
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  9. That's an interesting piece on gifting the crew. I came back to YYZ from FRA a couple of days ago and two different people gave the crew chocolates when boarding. They shared the stuff around the whole crew but left some out on the bar counter in J(777) for others to enjoy the rest.
    My 40 plus years of travelling has seen its share of mishaps with missed flights and delays,etc. I learned about 35 years ago that patience was the only virtue to have in those situations since you generally can't do much, if anything, about it. My schedule as well includes trips to various Countries with time commitments and some in secondary towns away for the major Cities so the patience virtue is much much a needed one.
     
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  10. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    I'll warn the locals. :D

    It's become a part of flying for me, a regular habit to prepare before a flight as much as packing. I always give it to them as soon as I board so the pilot can have some. On one flight none of the FAs wanted sweets, so the pilot put it with his bag in the cockpit and took it home to his family who have never had a king cake before.

    It makes for a pretty happy crew before we even get off the ground, and that's never a bad thing.
     
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  11. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    You're most definitely not alone. I've arrived at my long-haul "economy plus" seat (which means I paid >$200 extra out of pocket) on an United Airlines flight departing FRA to find someone else sitting in my seat, adamant that he should be able to sit there. All too often, the maturity, IQ, and manners of some folks "riding the bus" drops precipitously upon boarding the plane.

    All things considered, your advice about using your own headphones is the best! The last time I travelled on the long haul to get back from FRA, someone passed me in the aisle, and uttered an "I don't envy you"! When I asked him why he said that, he pointed out the family with the young baby one row behind me, that I hadn't noticed. Those headphones worked wonders, as I enjoyed movies and napped through the flight just fine! ;)
     
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  12. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    I'm curious, are you flying coach or business/first class? The reason I ask is that I'm wondering if it makes a difference when you "gift" the air crew.

    As a scuba diver, I've followed your example while on a live-aboard dive boat, where I've spent a week or more with the boat crew. If bringing some treats for the air crew helps with the long-haul trip while travelling in steerage class, I'm on board!
     
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  13. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    I bring goodies regardless of the class I am flying. I'd say I'm 1/2 first/business and 1/2 economy plus most of the time. When I'm in economy they will usually walk back and offer champagne or F goodies to me as a way of thanks. I don't ask for any special treatment, but it's nice they offer it. This usually happens on the domestic side, although I was on one flight to LHR where one of the FAs was originally from New Orleans. She snatched that king cake up faster than I could even explain what it was, took my boarding pass and wrote down my seat number, and told the other FAs to take care of me. Of course not everyone can bring king cakes, but I find a small sampler box of Guylian is just as appreciated (around $5 stateside, 5 pounds in London). If the flight is packed or the crew is really busy, I just write a note of thanks on the back of my business card and leave it in the galley. I do it for appreciation of the flight crew and never expect anything in return, so anything above that is just a bonus.
     
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  14. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Thank you, MSYgirl, for the great description of your travels! And I think that you have a wonderful attitude! Let's face it, it never hurts to be nice. On the one hand, I don't envy the FAs for all the grief that they put up with, and wouldn't want to have their job. On the other hand, I've run into a few FAs that pretty much acted like anything that they did for you was an immense favor. I'll have to remember to follow your example with my next long haul flight, and report back to you as to how things went. And when I do travel for work, I always bring gifts for our overseas colleagues to enjoy some treats from the States!
     
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  15. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    I did bring extra king cakes on my last trip to England for the Brits to sample, all of which said it was nice but too sweet. On my last trip I brought a king cake to my friend who met me in Vegas, and she enjoyed it so much it was gone before the end of the trip. Perhaps it's all the sugar we're used to over here.
     
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  16. flynow

    flynow Silver Member

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    ;)You go by the Golden Rule !!! I treat a person the way I like to be treated everyday.
     
  17. So you don't point bare feet at people on a flight?;)
     
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  18. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Well, your Milepoint post reminds me of this flight story from earlier this year, where a passenger behind me on a long-haul flight decided to put his stocking feet up on my arm rests! Needless to say, I had in mind the 3-pronged approach:
    1) remove his feet
    2) get the flight attendant's attention
    3) try to find a sharp object with which to...
    To my pleasant surprise, we didn't get past #1! :rolleyes:
     
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  19. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    What bitters is to us (or is it tonic), Speciality cakes are to them, Brits - An acquired taste :D
     
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  20. timfrost

    timfrost Silver Member

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    MSYGirl, your gifting to flight attendants is something that I was "brought up" to do and still do for all my flights. I try to get something readily share-able like a little bag of dove chocolates or the like. It's always appreciated by the crew.

    I work for Amtrak on the long-distance trains and recently I have been working the only train in the system with an unenviable 0% on time performance record (We have only had one train arrive on time in Chicago since March; the typical delay is 4-8 hours). We cause passengers to miss their connections every single week. Although I feel very bad when people miss weddings/conventions/my kid has a thing, a little research would go a long way... our horrible performance record is a PUBLIC record and published on our website, and I wish people would leave a day of buffer a little more often.

    I also see things on a regular basis that make feet poking through between chairs seem tame and bland. People wandering around in their underwear, etc. They also tend to treat those of us that work on board pretty horribly from time to time, and we have to live with some of these passengers for three solid days. I commute from LAX to SEA every week for my work trip on AS and I try to go well out of my way to be nice to the flight attendants... hoping that karma will repay me at some point.
     
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  21. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    Very well summed up. Irrespective of what one does as a job, we have to appreciate people that make our movement from point A to B safely, effortlessly, everyday !
     

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