Airlines collecting less money for bag fees (only $3.35B!!)

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by gregm, May 5, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Airlines are taking in less money from bag fees than they did two years ago, but they are making up for it by adding charges for a slew of extras, including getting a decent seat.

    The government reported Monday that U.S. airlines raised $3.35 billion from bag fees in 2013, down 4 percent from 2012. That is the biggest decline since fees to check a bag or two took off in 2008.

    Read more: http://news.yahoo.com/airlines-collecting-less-money-bag-fees-191418446.html
     
  2. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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  3. blackjack-21

    blackjack-21 Gold Member

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    And people wonder why more and more pax are jamming more stuff into larger carryon bags in the hope of avoiding those baggage fees, then causing lineups at security and the gates as they're told they then have to gatecheck the bag, or if allowed to board with their oversized bags holding up the other pax as they try to jam ten pounds of blavit into a five pound overhead?

    But I guess it's not possible or probable for the major airlines to ever give up such a large cash cow for them. At what point do their constantly increasing fares become high enough to include one piece of checked luggage at no extra charge for their non-elites on domestic flights?
     
  4. YULtide

    YULtide Gold Member

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    The horror! How will they pay the CEO bonuses? :eek:
     
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  5. pointshogger

    pointshogger Silver Member

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    It's a double-edge sword. When the economy is doing well, airlines will be profitable and they will have no incentive to do anything customer friendly.
     
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  6. blackjack-21

    blackjack-21 Gold Member

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    By trying to squeeze more seats into all their planes, including having a new availabilty (for a fee of course) of wider seating in the lavs for those who may desire more comfort and relaxation while joining the Mile High Club (and probably charging dues and an initiation fee for first time users, but discounted by differing percentages depending on your elite status when entering, or leaving), and differing too with times of day or redeye flights, and of course, depending on what meal service has preceeded that, be it paid or included with your F or J booking. With room and space availability quickly running out, where else is there any room to further expand their paid offerings?
     
  7. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Well, one can't blame every CEO for earning. If the airline was doing poorly, I would criticize executive bonuses, but DL is doing well. And, on a more personal note, RA and I have communicated, via email, 2-4 times a year for the past few years. (I never complain to him. I feel that's out of line.) With one exception, he has answered every email personally. I find him to be an interesting and worth-while 'pen pal'. Just my 'CEO experience'.
     
  8. blackjack-21

    blackjack-21 Gold Member

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    I guess it's who you know, and who knows whom. The only reply I've ever gotten from nearby the CEO's office was some years ago to CO's (Keller?) from my complimentary email after a good trip, with an outstanding crew. His executive secretary replied with both an email and call, saying that he had read my email and appreciated my taking the time to send it, and she offered her private, unlisted, super-secret phone number should I have any suggestions or questions for the CEO in the future.

    At the time, I should have suggested that CO not merge with UA, but they probably wouldn't have listened to me anyway, and now that everything's moved to a windier city, it's a bit too late. While I still have her phone number, it seems to have been replaced by a robotic recording of a dial tone.
     
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  9. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Only related to our informal communications. Like your experience, and I've never asked for him to do me any favors. I actually questioned why his secretary replied and the answer was one I was glad to hear.
     
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