Airline practices partially to blame for rude fliers

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by sobore, Jul 24, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/letters/2011-07-24-rude-fliers-air-travel_n.htm

    Airlines bear some culpability for what annoys flight attendants and peeves frequent fliers.

    Cramming more seats into a coach cabin leads to passengers with nowhere to put their limbs, so arms or legs hang out in the aisle. Checked baggage fees lead to travelers carrying on bags they can't lift into the overhead bins, and people who board with multiple or oversized bags.
    So long as airlines treat customers like cattle, lack of respect for others will continue and get worse.
     
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  2. NYBanker
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    So long as most customers select their air carrier based principally on price of the ticket, airlines will continue to treat them like cattle...
     
  3. violist
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    violist Gold Member

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    news, how?
     
  4. KyRoamer
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    KyRoamer Gold Member

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    Passing the buck? Everyone has a choice as to how to behave. Remember what your mother likely told you -- two wrongs do not make a right.
     
  5. CDKing
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    CDKing Gold Member

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    UA seems to be partially to blame of how people expect compensation for every little thing
     
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  6. Captain Oveur
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    Captain Oveur Gold Member

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    Things I regularly see have more to do with it:
    - A "go, GO, GO!" approach while boarding. It's not uncommon for FAs (and cockpit crew) to surreptitiously blame the boarding passengers for a departure delay, even though the inbound plane was late (for whatever reason), and a gutsy 40-minute scheduled turnaround time. How do the crew blame the passengers? Regularly passengers are hurried and told "if you don't get settled, we're going to be late."
    - And, of course after being told to "move it!," passengers want to do nothing but get out of their seat and disembark to make their scheduled 35-minute connection , only to be told to stay in their seats. I'm sure there's a phrase or two that succinctly describes that, but it's not natural.
    - Flight crew in the galley (or even i the aisles) complaining about their schedule or how they didn't get the non-rev F seat to Paris last month.
    - Contract (Airserv) staff busy texting on their phones, not bothering to see the wheelchairs they are supposed to be navigating hitting people in the shins and feet.
    - TSA screeners having the "guilty until proven innocent" model. Passengers getting their privates touched just because they want to take a vacation.
     
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  7. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    It all comes down to the price pax will pay. If you pay $300 for a JFK-lax transcon in y, this is probably what you'll get.

    Fly f out of FRA on LH and you'll have a decidedly different experience. QF f out of Mel will offer you a superior experience as well. Your wallet will be 4 or 5 digits lighter, however, too!

    If you've been subjected to much of the crap you talk about (who hasn't in the US), consider paying up for AA's 5-star service. For a more modest $125 extra at their major airports, you'll be escorted past almost all of the unpleasantries you lament about.
     
  8. cordray2643
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    cordray2643 Silver Member

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    Really? The changes in attitudes are happening everywhere in our society, not just on the airplane. We are all so busy now compared to even 10 years ago. The pace of our lives is much to blame for our short fuses and extended expectations.
     
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  9. ctporter
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    ctporter Silver Member

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    So true! But why? Is this a result of deregulation or could it be more? Are more people traveling more now, not just for work, but also for pleasure because of more disposable income?
     
  10. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    It is a combination of the capital intensive nature, sex-appeal lure of the industry and a now well engrained view to shop for the low fare no matter what. The airline business is one that attracts a lot of dreamers. Lots start out, few survive. In the most simplified terms, you buy an airplane for $50 million, then sell seats at $300 a pop. Invariably, a new carrier turns up and says they'll get you there for $299. "Sure, I'll try the $299," is what goes through a customers head. And it spirals downward from there.

    I flew on a flight a few weeks ago that was really nice. It was a fancy business class ticket (company paid). I got free lounge access. There was a hot meal served. There was a decent avod ife system. The steward on board helped the lady pax(s) put their bag in the overhead bin. Was I on on a sq 777 galavanting in Asia? No - I was on an RJ in North America. A 300 mile flight, at that. Air Canada, LGA to yyz. For whatever reason (presumably regulatory), the Canadian market has faced much less competition. The result: it cost 3x as much to fly LGA-yyz in front than it does to fly LGA-FLL in front, despite FLL being 3x farther!! Many pax lament about the fares to Canada, but at least in j, it was a pretty nice service. Certainly the nicest RJ experience I've ever had.

    To compare, I flew AA home. Also on an RJ....similar ridiculous fare....but sadly AA's weak domestic service.

    I doubt the airline industry as a whole as turned an aggregate profit since inception. Maybe they have, but in a market with light regulation (as to new entrants), competition - fueled by customer behavior - drives a race to the bottom.

    Owning an airport is much, much better than owning an airline.
     
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  11. NYBanker
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    Was it Peoples Express that started this downward spiral? Did they ruin it for everyone? ;)
     
  12. violist
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    violist Gold Member

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    Deregulation had its ups and downs ...
     
  13. legalalien
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    legalalien Gold Member

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    Fair enough...but so did regulation.

    I feel that a lot of complaints are due the flying public's expectations being too high. That is, many still view air travel as being an adventure, when it's really no different from any other mode of public transportation.
     
  14. legalalien
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    legalalien Gold Member

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    Doesn't it show that the price paid for the ticket is largely irrelevant? I fly to Canada regularly, and while AC planes are newer and service is mostly fine, I don't think it justifies 2x or 3x price difference over what similar route costs in the US.

    Canada has had its share of failed low-cost carriers. The industry has been largely deregulated since the 80s, and I think the lower number of carriers is due to the smaller addressable market spread out over larger area.
     
  15. RestlessLocationSyndrome
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    RestlessLocationSyndrome Silver Member

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    The simple fact is that everyone is to blame. This goes for the airline companies, the airline employees, the government, the passengers and our society at large. We all have done our part in ensuring that flying is as unpleasant as it is today.

    The question I'm interested in is, What do we really want flying to be like and what do we need to change in order to get there? Once we can answer this strategic question either for all airline travel or for an individual airline, we can then make all the changes necessary to provide a consistent experience for airline employees and passengers.
     
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