Air traffic control modernization hits turbulence

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  1. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.weirtondailytimes.com/pa...nization-hits-turbulence.html?isap=1&nav=5015

    Ten years after Congress gave the go-ahead to modernize the nation's air traffic control system, one of the government's most ambitious and complex technology programs is in trouble.

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System, or NextGen, was promoted as a way to accommodate an anticipated surge in air travel, reduce fuel consumption and improve safety and efficiency. By shifting from radar-based navigation and radio communications — technologies rooted in the first half of the 20th century — to satellite-based navigation and digital communications, it would handle three times as many planes with half as many air traffic controllers by 2025, the Federal Aviation Administration promised.

    Planes would fly directly to their destinations using GPS technology instead of following indirect routes to stay within the range of ground stations. They would continually broadcast their exact positions, not only to air traffic controllers, but to other similarly equipped aircraft. For the first time, pilots would be able to see on cockpit displays where they were in relation to other planes.

    That would enable planes to safely fly closer together, and even shift some of the responsibility for maintaining a safe separation of planes from controllers to pilots. But almost nothing has happened as FAA officials anticipated.

    Read More: http://www.weirtondailytimes.com/pa...nization-hits-turbulence.html?isap=1&nav=5015
     
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