Air India Dreamliner windscreen cracks on Melbourne landing

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  1. Air India Dreamliner windscreen cracks on Melbourne landing
    • AFP
    • NOVEMBER 05, 2013 8:23AM

    [​IMG]
    An Air India Dreamliner windshield cracked while landing in Australia, the latest in a string of mishaps the aircraft has suffered in recent times. Source: AFP

    AN Air India Dreamliner windshield cracked while landing in Australia, an airline official has said in the latest of a string of mishaps the aircraft has suffered in recent times.

    The Delhi-Melbourne-Sydney-Delhi flight, carrying 74 passengers, developed a crack late on Sunday while landing in Melbourne city, Air India spokesman Praveen Bhatnagar told AFP Monday.

    "The cockpit windscreen developed a crack while landing. It was a small incident. The windscreen has already been replaced," said Mr Bhatnagar, adding that there was no risk to the safety of passengers.

    While all passengers were transferred to another flight to Delhi, Air India flew in a new windshield from India to replace the cracked one.

    Air India Dreamliner touched down in Australia in September after a 16-year gap, marking the resumption of direct flights to Australia.

    However, the Air India Boeing 787 Dreamliner fleet has been suffering technical glitches of late, including an incident where the fuselage panel of a jet fell off last month while landing in the southern city of Bangalore.

    The Dreamliner has encountered several serious difficulties since entering operation two years ago, especially with its batteries, causing the entire fleet to be grounded for about four months earlier this year.

    But Air India dismissed any claims of technical glitches on the Melbourne-bound flight.

    "It was no aircraft glitch. This may have happened due to rapid change in temperatures or some other particles on the windscreen while landing," said Bhatnagar.

    Scandinavian operator Norwegian Air Shuttle has also criticised the plane's reliability after it found a flaw in the electrical system.

    AFP

    - See more at: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/bus...y-e6frg95x-1226753199398#sthash.QTG8jSUl.dpuf
     
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  2. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    What a piece of scrambled marmalade on fried spam !!! These spokespersons are worse than Intelligent-Design theorists :D
     
  3. that stock photo is not from Tullamarine MEL) either
     
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  4. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    That's an Indian security guard. Probably DEL.
     
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  5. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    (bolding mine)

    Only 74 pax? The Air India 788 has seats for 256 pax according to Seatguru.
     
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  6. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    Terrible loads ! AI was never known for efficient route deployment. It is a white elephant, draining the government coffers for decades !
     
  7. yes not to be confused with the white fellas at Tulla (MEL)
     
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  8. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    Every airplane is subject to occasional cracks in the multi-layered windows, especially the windscreen. Rapid descents with steep temperature gradients make it worse, as do bird strikes or other such events. I personally have had two windscreens crack on planes I was piloting. These events are very rarely causes for immediate danger, but the windscreens must be replaced before further flight. This is nothing unusual nor unique to the B787. This is another event that seems more serious than it actually usually is.
     
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  9. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    Oh thanks jbc for explaining. Learn something new everyday :)
     
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  10. just incase you are interacting with this guy, do yourself a favour


    The long term FT'ers hate this guy and for good reason:
    PM Canadi>n, YEGman, Concerto, or myself GoodBoy, we will all tell you the truth about him, 13 members of the FLounge that accounts for 25% of all the posts on MP totally ignore him, refuse to interact with him, he has no credibility, he was kicked off FT by Randy, he doe not deserve to be on MP

    http://milepoint.com/forums/threads/air-canada-forum-members-personal-discussion.71506/
     
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  11. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    Since this post I have been watching incident reports for windshield cracks. Here is one from yesterday:
    "An American Airlines Boeing 757-200, registration N655AA performing flight AA-160 from Miami,FL to Boston,MA (USA) with 150 passengers and 6 crew, was enroute at FL370 about 170nm northwest of Orlando,FL (USA) over the Atlantic Ocean when the crew observed electrical arcing from the left hand windshield followed by a loud pop and the windshield's inner pane cracking. The crew initiated a rapid descent to 10,000 feet and diverted to Orlando for a safe landing about one hour later." Av Herald
    That is one of the most common causes, electrical anti-icing elements that degrade, arc, and break one or more inner windshield layers. The solution is almost never an accident cause, but does cause the aircrew to descend quickly to a non-supplemental-oxygen level, normally about 10,000 feet or so, then land as soon as practical to do so. It is not an emergency, but could become one without proper actions.
     
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  12. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    Here is another one from yesterday in Rio de Janeiro as a departing AF 744 encountered hail that cracked a windshield, among other things:
    "An Air France Boeing 747-400, registration F-GITI performing flight AF-443 from Rio de Janeiro,RJ (Brazil) to Paris Charles de Gaulle (France), was climbing out of Rio's runway 15 at about 18:35L (20:35Z) when the aircraft encountered hail resulting in a cracked first officer's windshield. The aircraft levelled off at FL150, dumped fuel and returned to Rio for a safe landing on runway 15 about 110 minutes after departure. The aircraft received substantial damage to nose cone, leading edges of wings and stabilizers as well as the windshield.

    Passengers reported the aircraft also received a lightning strike.

    The airline confirmed the aircraft returned to Rio de Janeiro due to a damaged windscreen. The flight was cancelled." Av Herald

    BTW, this hail, a rarity in in Rio, damaged a fair number of vehicles on the ground also, and made us have a noisy evening at home, although we had no damage.
    Airplanes can endure a lot of abuse, can't they? The lightning strike that came with the hail for the AF 744 seems to have caused no problems. Ordinarily taht is teh case, although sometimes there is some burned paint from the area which was hit by the strike and there is the node fireball taht passes through the cabin, almost never with damage, but producing serious excitement anyway. From personal experience I can attest that such an event does produce major attention.
     
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  13. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    Very strange to hear about hail.
     
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