Air Canada special meals

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by techauthor, Apr 19, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. techauthor
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    techauthor Silver Member

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    We're flying Toronto to Shanghai next month in Biz. My wife wants to eat light on the flight and I know they'll serve us often and well.

    Has anyone ordered special meals in Biz on AC? I'm wondering if something like Vegetarian (or even Asian Vege, whatever that is) might be a good choice.

    Once, many years ago I ordered vegetarian on a domestic US flight in F and got a cold, dry cheese sandwich. I'd like to avoid repeating that mistake.

    Moderator: If this is the wrong forum, please move it and accept my apologies.
     
  2. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    I know AC has a Hindu Vegetarian meal and a Chinese Vegetarian meal, I'm just not sure if they can be ordered on all routes.
     
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  3. SYM
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    SYM Silver Member

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    Special meals are hit and miss. I don't think they are always different in J - last week I sat in J beside a fellow who had ordered the kosher meal, and he told me it's the same meal in Y or J. I would not try anything fancy (like hindu veg) out of PVG - that is just asking for disappointment.

    I take this flight (or YYZ-PEK) often. I usually sleep after takeoff, and ask the SD to save me a tray with no hot meal. When I wake up, I have the appetizer, the salad, maybe a snack from the galley, and the desert. Prior to landing (in the afternoon), when everyone else is being served breakfast, I take the tray again, but have a salad or noodle soup instead of the omelet. This is just my method; there are endless variations. It is possible to take this flight without over-eating
     
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  4. SYM
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    SYM Silver Member

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    I'd forgotten this story - my brother-in-law, a journalist, heard that the special meals were far better than the ordinary fare. So he ordered the kosher meal. But he's not Jewish, so he didn't know it was a high holiday (Passover, perhaps?). His special meal: matzoh bread and a bunch of grapes.
     
  5. techauthor
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    techauthor Silver Member

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    Since you take this flight often, do you have any tips for dealing with the half-day jet lag? I go to Europe 8-10 times a year and have that down pat (daytime flight to LHR, 6 hrs sleep in a local hotel, next AM flight to wherever I need to go)
     
  6. SYM
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    SYM Silver Member

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    If there's a magic bullet, I haven't found it. I don't think I've ever really thought about this systematically, but here is what I do:

    It's very unhelpful that flights typically operate on time zone at departure rather than time zone at destination (though Andrew's post at FT explains why). So I guess my strategy boils down to doing everything I can to work against that.

    Going both directions, you are leaving first thing in the morning at destination time. So I imagine myself twenty years ago, having just stayed up all night. I try to eat a high-carb meal before getting on the plane (easy in PVG or PEK because the noodle bar in the lounge is open; pasta bar at YYZ), have a drink and a zopiclone on boarding, then sleep as long as I can. By that point it is noon or early afternoon at destination time. So I start drinking coffee/tea. I try to stay awake through the rest of the flight and the evening. I take another sleeping pill on the first night, which means I am sleeping on destination time. Now that I think about it, whether I am able to sleep 4 hours or 6 hours at the start of the flight makes a big difference to how quickly I adjust.
    I find, like most people, that coming home is MUCH worse than going. I need to be 'on' in China, but can usually relax a bit when I get home. Also, my last day in China is a travel day - positioning myself for the TPAC (usually PEK, sometimes PVG or NRT). So if at all possible, I stay up all night on the last night, or at least till 3 or 4 in the morning. I feel like crap the next day, because I'm already adjusting to the new time zone I intend to be in, but it doesn't matter because I'm travelling anyways.

    Just my 2c, would welcome other ideas

    ps the noodle bar in the lounge that AC uses at PVG is well hidden. It is at the opposite end of the lounge from the rest of the food, back by the entrance. There are three or four tables, and a small window in the wall with a bell.
     
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