Advice on consolidating Chase credit card accounts

Discussion in 'Other Credit Card Programs' started by PhlyingRPh, Feb 18, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. PhlyingRPh
    Original Member

    PhlyingRPh Silver Member

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    Issue:
    I feel as though my Chase cards have been breeding or something

    Rationale:
    I've got a couple of no-fee MP Visa cards (from conversions of previous MP Platinum/Signature cards), a Gold MP Visa, a CO OnePass Plus MC, a Marriott Premier Visa, a couple of those Chase Freedom Visa cards and a couple of ink cards for business. I pay off balances each month and only use the CO MC and Marriott Visa to any great extent. I've also got other credit card families to cull (Citibank and Amex) but I'll get to them later.

    Goal:
    To simplify my life - cut Chase cards down to two for personal use.

    Has anyone had experience with persuading Chase to retain the equivalent credit limit of all combined cards, splitting it between a couple of fee-based cards and retaining the original opening date of the oldest account? If so, are there certain cards Chase is more amenable to doing this with? Do they try to push you into a higher fee card? (I don't mind opening a Presidential Plat or equiv - since I am a UC member anyway). Any thoughts or advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. MDDCFlyer

    MDDCFlyer Silver Member

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    Chase is quite lenient with allowing moving credit lines around - however, I don't think you'll get any luck with keeping the original opening date of the oldest account unless you move the credit to that account (I don't think it even possible to do the way it reported to the credit reports).
     
  3. schnitzel
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    schnitzel Gold Member

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    A lot of stories have recently said that in order to get credit in your score for having old accounts, those accounts don't necessarily still have to be open. I'm not quite sure I buy that logic, but this whole thing is a bit of an enigma.

    So, if that's the case, you don't really lose anything by closing an old account, as long as you're preserving the credit line.
     
  4. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    That wasn't by any chance blog posts that effectively said:

    1. We just discovered that old accounts can be closed and still contribute to a high credit score
    2. I just happened to come across this awesome new Sapphire card that I think you should look at. Look... shiney!
    3. close your old account and use my link to get this new Sapphire card. And remember, your credit score is your most valuable asset

    ;)
     
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  5. schnitzel
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    schnitzel Gold Member

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    Ha! No. It wasn't. I'm very well aware of the Sapphire-shilling that's going on. Chase is paying these guys a small fortune to "advise" us. I confess, though, that I do use the card for meals, and I did click-through a blogger back when I got it.

    If you wanna start a "do the bloggers work for us or the credit card companies" thread, I'll be happy to unload over there. Those guys are really dropping the ball, in my book. And, consequently, I'm spending a lot more time on MP.
     
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  6. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    We already have one (or more) of those. Sorry for side-tracking this thread.

    Now back to our regularly scheduled topic. I assume the age of the credit card account is tied to the account number, and I don't think Chase allows you to switch "brands" and retain the number (i.e., you can't turn your UA card into a Marriott card and keep the UA number). So switching the oldest non-earning account number with a more desirable brand is probably not an option.
     
    kenbo likes this.

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