AC PLANE MAKES EMERGENCY LANDING

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by guinnessxyz, May 28, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    For those of us who are reluctant to click on a random link, it would help to write a summary for your post instead of just posting a link.
     
  2. I didn't summarize the link because the G&M said "more details to follow".
     
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  3. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    I rolled the dice. Here's what it says as of 8:19pm eastern...

    An Air Canada plane bound for Japan made an emergency landing at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport after one of its two engines shut down after takeoff.
    The airline’s spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick says there were no injuries among the 318 passengers and 16 crew aboard flight AC001 to Narita airport in Tokyo, and they will fly out Tuesday on a new plane.
    The jet, which departed at 2:26 p.m. Monday made a safe emergency landing at 3:53 p.m. Mr. Fitzpatrick added the Boeing 777 crew said the cause of the engine shutdown is not known.
    Debris, reportedly from the plane, fell onto vehicles and just west of the airport in Mississauga, Peel police said, but aside from broken windows and minor property damage, there were no injuries.
     
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  4. jrp2

    jrp2 Gold Member

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    thanks for the info.
     
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  5. NYCAdventurer

    NYCAdventurer Gold Member

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    Glad everyone is safe!
     
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  6. jetsetboy

    jetsetboy Silver Member

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    Exactly! I don't even want to think about the debris hitting a person or animal.
     
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  7. LETTERBOY
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    LETTERBOY Gold Member

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    That would've been very bad.

    On a somewhat lighter note, I remember reading (many years ago) about a gentleman in the US who got hit with, shall we say, human waste, that had been jettisoned somehow from an aircraft lav. :D:eek:
     
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  8. igloocoder
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    igloocoder Silver Member

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    Proof that sh*t really does travel in the same general direction as gravity. Not a good sign for frequent fliers.
     
  9. jetsetboy

    jetsetboy Silver Member

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    Eewww! :eek:
     
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  10. DeacFlyer1
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    DeacFlyer1 Silver Member

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  11. milchap
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    milchap Gold Member

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    There were at least 27 documented incidents of blue ice impacts in the United States between 1979 and 2003.[1] These incidents typically happen under airport landing paths as the mass warms sufficiently to detach from the plane during its descent. A rare incident of falling blue ice causing damage to the roof of a home was reported on October 20, 2006 in Chino, California.[2] A similar incident was reported in Leicester, UK, in 2007.[3]
    In 1971, a chunk of ice from an aircraft tore a large hole in the roof of the Essex Street Chapel in Kensington, London, and was one trigger for the demolition of the building.[4] In November 2011 a chunk of ice, the size of an orange, broke through the roof of a private house in Ratingen-Hösel, Germany. ( Wikepedia)
     
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  12. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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  13. milchap
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    milchap Gold Member

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  14. I APOLOGIZE:p
     
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  15. DeacFlyer1
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    DeacFlyer1 Silver Member

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    Neither of the articles I've read here (the original or the update) mention what type of engine (RR, PW, GE) was on this particular bird--does anyone know what type of engine the AC 777's fly? Also, was this a 773 or a 772?
     
  16. YULtraveller

    YULtraveller Silver Member

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    777-300ERs (like the one in this incident, the AvHerald link above provides reg #) and 777-200LRs.

    As for engine type, with these two, you can have any type you want as long as it is a GE90 (it doesn't have to be black...;))
     
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  17. milchap
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    milchap Gold Member

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  18. tcook052
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    http://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...anada-investigation-of-ge90-shut-down-372432/

    General Electric confirms it has sent a technical representative to Air Canada to support the investigation of an in-flight shut-down of a GE90-115B powering a Boeing 777-300ER.

    The International Lease Finance (ILFC)-owned aircraft, with serial number 35298 and registration C-FITW, turned back after an explosive engine failure shortly after take-off from Toronto Pearson International Airport on 28 May.
    The GE90-115B reportedly shed parts around the airport grounds. An air traffic controller informed the Air Canada flight crew during the incident that local police had found part of an engine cowling nearby.

    The crew of Flight 001, which was en route to Tokyo-Narita airport, circled around the airport and dumped fuel before landing with one engine powering the aircraft.

    The incident marked a rare in-flight shutdown for the GE90 series. GE reports that the GE90 series has accumulated an in-flight shut-down rate of 0.002 over a 15-year service life.
     
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  19. tomh009
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    tomh009 Gold Member

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    0.002? That's one flight in 250 would suffer a shutdown, given two engines. That's only about two years of flying for some of us ...
     
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  20. travelmommy

    travelmommy Active Member

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    Thank God no one was hurt! I have a terrible fear of flying. Every single flight is a suffering for me!
     
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  21. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    So how does this accident compare to the Qantas/Airbus/Rolls Royce engine blow up last year?
     
  22. rehoult
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    rehoult Gold Member

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    Given the number of GE90 flying and the limited number of shutdowns reported on AV Herald, I expect he was giving the % of flights that experience a shutdown and not the probability of a shutdown.
     
  23. rehoult
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    rehoult Gold Member

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    Not even close. The 380 engine blowup was due to a major manufacturing fault and was uncontained, throwing shrapnel into various parts of the control and fuel systems. It was, by any measure, a major failure and could have been catastrophic. The plane was out of service for ages.

    This event, while clearly not good, was a fairly routine failure. Something (we will find out what in about a year) caused the high pressure turbine to break apart, but it was a contained failure and the parts ejected through the exhaust pipe (this is by design so it won't hit any other part of the airplane). The emergency happened on May 28 and the airplane was back in service on May 31. The failsafes appear to have worked exactly as they should have.

    Something obviously happened that shouldn't have, but it really wasn't comparable to QF32 at all.
     
  24. AC_Flyer

    AC_Flyer Silver Member

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    The press made a big deal about the 77W incident as pieces fell and damaged 4 cars on the ground, while the QF incident happened over some islands in Indonesia and am not sure about damages on the ground. The QF A380 had major work done to the fuselage which took months. I believe the aircraft was out of service for over a year and only recently started flying again.
     
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