AA's first 787 moved back up earlier, to 2014 again

Discussion in 'American Airlines | AAdvantage' started by kansaskeith, Jan 14, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. kansaskeith

    kansaskeith Gold Member

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  2. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Did Doug Parker approve? ;)
     
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  3. DestinationDavid
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    DestinationDavid Milepoint Guide

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    Hopefully the one's that are delivered to AA don't spill fuel or have mysterious electrical fires.
     
  4. zphelj

    zphelj Gold Member

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    By then the initial kinks will have been worked out. Hopefully all will be quiet but predicting the future is not my strong suit. There could be a whole new set of mysteries!
     
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  5. Mike Reed

    Mike Reed Gold Member

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    Especially at the same time!

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
  6. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    AMRCorp_8K_20130114_1.pdf
    [​IMG]
    American restructures aircraft purchase agreement; first 787 to arrive in Nov-2014

    CAPA > Aviation News > American restructures aircraft purchase agreement; first 787 to arrive in Nov-2014
    15-Jan-2013 9:52 AM
    © CAPA
    American Airlines announced (14-Jan-2013) the completion of an aircraft purchase agreement with Boeing. The agreement includes an accelerated delivery schedule for 42 787s with the first arriving in Nov-2014 through 2018. The agreement also includes options to change 20 787-8 orders to 787-9s and will leave American with firm orders for 117 737s, 18 777s and 42 787s with options for 40 737s, 13 777s and 58 787s.


    AMR 11 january 8K has all the details if anybody is so inclined. Here is the PDF.
     

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  7. kyunbit
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    kyunbit Silver Member

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    great info. 42 787s is quite a lot. Hope they open up new routes
     
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  8. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    They currently are intended to replace existing older aircraft. Who knows what might happen though...
     
  9. DestinationDavid
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    Not directly related to AA's order, but JL and NH just announced they're grounding their 787s due to all the MX issues.
     
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  10. foxberg

    foxberg Gold Member

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    I don't mind to wait until they work out the hick-ups.
     
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  11. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    We can only hope that the ANA incident was an overreaction, but it probably was prudent to ground the fleet. About now Boeing must be in a fairly deep panic, hopefully a productive one, assuming that is possible.

    Considering that all these issues, according to 'industry sources' relate to electrical problems, and most of them are related to a single circuit board, it seems likely that the entire review and required AD's, emergency or otherwise, will be dealt with within a few months at the most.

    Allegedly:
    1. the fuel venting problems were a result of incorrect movements in valves, thus a result fo electrical actuation errors.
    2. The battery fire was similarly, so it seems, a result fo errors in electrical limit switches controlling rate and level of charge/discharge. (this seems a trifle odd to me since there are four, count 'em, four backups to prevent such problems. the FAA was very reluctant to accept lithium-ion batteries back in 2007 so this is allegedly a big part of the certification review.
    3. The reported brake problems were teh result, allegedly, of an electrical brake actuator malfunction.
    4. The cracked windshields, however, seemingly had nothing to do with electrical issues, unless they were related to the electrical windshield deice/anti-ice system.

    All these "allegedly" points are because nobody is saying anything for attribution, nor do I blame them.

    AMR will, I am confident, have no significant issues with the B787 deployment. Of course, we do not live in a perfect world, nor do I have the technical or product knowledge to make such statements. However, the B777 and A380, the most recent two all-new large aircraft, had some seemingly major teething problems that have been resolved well, albeit expensively. The B787 and the A350 next year, will have such issues too.
     
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  12. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    Now would be the time to buy and get the best price. I feel based on all the recent 787 issues AA should be able to close a deal in the Hyudai Sonata price range. :eek:
     
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  13. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    I wonder? Somehow I suspect there may be a very short interval of delayed orders, but these problems all seem likely to be susceptible to rapid resolution, don't they. It is not as if such issues do not arise with nearly all new aircraft. Emergency landing and deplaning, followed by fleet grounding is not Business as Usual, though. I do not want to be Pollyanna. Somehow I think overreaction may be the better part of judgement, from an operators perspective.
     
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  14. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    I tend to agree. A bit of a tough start for the Dreamliner, but its best days are ahead. The first production release of anything has its quirks and bugs although with an aircraft issues are magnified for safety, as it should be.
     
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  15. kansaskeith

    kansaskeith Gold Member

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    Don't know why (actually I do), but this brings back memories from about 1958.

    My mother and I had accompanied my father as we took him to the "old" (east of Sepulveda Boulevard) LAX for a business trip which was to begin on an AA 707. My mother was a little nervous, of course, particularly since the national news had been full of reports the brand new 707s were having with their landing gear not operating properly because of hydraulic problems. There had been tense moments in several flights as gear had to be coaxed down manually or whatever. But my father assured his wife that all would be fine.

    So we walked out to the gate with Dad (hey, what's a T.S.A.?), and admired the neat jet plane, which looked just fine to Dad and me. And it was this cool silver! Some things never change. (Oh, wait!)

    We said our goodbyes, watched him and the other passengers walk up the stairway (no JetWay, no Priority AAcess), and then the door shut and the staircase retracted.

    As the plane pushed back and the nose wheel turned slightly. . ., yep, SPLAT! A bunch of ugly hydraulic fluid plopped down onto the tarmac. My mother and I and all the other folks at the gate pointed our fingers at the big puddle. The pullback stopped, the stairwell rolled back to the door, which opened (though no pax deplaned), and AA maintenance trucks pulled in from all over.

    As if on queue, an AA passenger-service agent appeared from nowhere to assure my mother (and I am sure other wives and loved ones at the gate) that yes, there seemed to be a hydraulic problem, but not to worry. They would fix it, and even if they hadn't caught the problem right then, the plane had all sorts of backup, and would have completed its flight safely.

    Dad wasn't allowed to turn his cell phone back on when the front door had opened, because, of course. . . what the hell is a cell phone?! The agent told Mom passengers wouldn't be deplaning, and we should just go on home and not to worry. Somehow, at least on his first piece of advice, she agreed, and off we went. LAX probably charged 25 cents an hour to park, after all, and she didn't want to rack up too big of a bill.

    Dad's flight, his business trip, and the life of the Boeing 707 product line all ended up quite successful. The future of aviation, and world commerce, changed as a result of that line of airplanes.

    I predict the 787 will do similarly well. However, the immediate uncertainty will not be fun at all. For reasons not of personal safety -- but rather fears of delays, diversions and all -- I am not going to rush to book a trip right this mroning. And if I were a Boeing Co. shareholder, I would worry in the short-term because of the costs in fixing the problems, and because of hesitant people in the public like me. And my late mother :)
     
  16. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    Great story! Thanks for sharing! :)
     
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  17. jbcarioca
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    jbcarioca Gold Member

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    Excellent story!
     
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  18. DestinationDavid
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    Guess it's a good thing AA doesn't have any 787s yet since the FAA just issued an AD grounding all those registered within the US: LINK.
     
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  19. foxberg

    foxberg Gold Member

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    Yeah, just saw it on FOX.
     
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  20. pnoeric

    pnoeric Silver Member

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    Considering the (temporary, small) glitches with the 787, this pushback of AA's order might be a silver lining. In any case, I'm just very happy to hear about the order restructuring... glitches or not, changing their order with Boeing so they get more 787s is a good thing!
     
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  21. kansaskeith

    kansaskeith Gold Member

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    More silver lining, Eric: By the time Boeing is finished with AA's 787 and ready to paint it, "The New American" will have its livery sorted out! :) It damn well better!
     
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  22. kansaskeith

    kansaskeith Gold Member

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    Just updating the thread: the F.A.A. action earlier today officially affected only U.S.-based airlines' 787s (which meant UA). Because of the F.A.A.'s influence, and particularly because the 787 is built by a U.S. company, other governments were expected to follow suit. And now authorities in India, Japan and Europe (for Poland) have done so. http://www.cnbc.com/id/100385850
     
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  23. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    LAN, too. So who does that leave... Ethiopian? (interestingly, I have two segments on Ethiopian's 787 booked for my wife in a couple months).
     
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  24. DestinationDavid
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    And Qatar.
     
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  25. desamo

    desamo Gold Member

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    Yes it did, partly because of the crash that killed my father-in-law on N799PA in December 1968, which led to much-needed updates of checklists. A well-debugged checklist can save your life. Sadly, he did not have one.

    http://www.airdisaster.com/reports/ntsb/AAR69-08.pdf
     
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