AA pilots test benefits of iPad in cockpit

Discussion in 'American Airlines | AAdvantage' started by sobore, Jun 20, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,421
    Likes Received:
    33,847
    Status Points:
    16,520
    http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/article.aspx?subjectid=45&articleid=20110618_45_E1_CUTLIN202620

    Pilots at American Airlines have begun a six-month program testing hand-held tablet computers that provide access in the cockpit to electronic flight, airport and operations data, company executives said.

    Authorized by the Federal Aviation Administration, the "electronic flight bag program" enables pilots to receive instantaneous updates on takeoff, routing, approach, landing and emergency procedures.

    Instead of carrying the paper charts and documents - as pilots have for years - in a flight bag weighing up to 35 pounds, cockpit crews can retrieve the same information on a 1.5-pound Apple iPad tablet computer, airline officials said.

    "This will revolutionize cockpits for our pilots," said American spokeswoman Andrea Huguely. "Pilots will be able to carry operations manuals digitally, charts for worldwide locations, emergency checklists and current flight information.

    "This is one of those things that goes hand-in-hand with airspace modernization and instrument flight procedures. It makes a much better work environment for our pilots."
    American's Los Angeles-based Boeing 777 pilots began testing the tablet computers Thursday.


    Pilots on two daily flights from Los Angeles to Tokyo and Los Angeles to Shanghai are authorized to test the iPad computers during all phases of flight, officials said.

    Hank Putek, an American pilot and member of American's Allied Pilots Association Safety Committee, has led the union's efforts to develop and deploy electronic flight bags. American and APA began conferring with the FAA about the program in 2006, officials said.

    "American Airlines has now become the first to deploy iPads with an electronic-charting solution," Putek said. "By eliminating bulky flight bags filled with paper, EFBs mean less weight for pilots to carry, reducing the possibility of injury on duty. In addition, they enable pilots to immediately download updates, rather than waiting for paper versions of required documents to be printed and distributed."

    American executives estimate that if iPad tablet computers were deployed - and traditional 35-pound flight bags eliminated - in cockpits throughout its system, the company would save $1.2 million a year in fuel expenses alone. The company also would reduce its paper printing and distribution costs, executives said.

    Putek said he is proud APA and American are leading a program that could transform the airline industry.
     
  2. Eloy Fonseca Neto
    Original Member

    Eloy Fonseca Neto Silver Member

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    1,024
    Status Points:
    870
    This is a good thing! Congrats to all involved!!!
     
  3. SC Flier
    Original Member

    SC Flier Gold Member

    Messages:
    14,851
    Likes Received:
    30,839
    Status Points:
    16,520
    Is it loaded with Angry Birds?
     
    sobore, DestinationDavid and Grace like this.
  4. Tenmoc
    Original Member

    Tenmoc Gold Member

    Messages:
    31,882
    Likes Received:
    212,880
    Status Points:
    20,020
    As long as they require more than one tab in the cockpit, this is good.
     
  5. TRAVELSIG
    Original Member

    TRAVELSIG Gold Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    Likes Received:
    5,509
    Status Points:
    4,145
    Interesting. Given the potential for savings, strange to wait for the Ipad and not have constructed an electronic solution years ago.
     
    sobore likes this.
  6. Travel2Food
    Original Member

    Travel2Food Silver Member

    Messages:
    445
    Likes Received:
    374
    Status Points:
    535
    There were/are earlier solutions that are used in the bizjet world. They are based on the earlier versions of tablets and laptops - which are bulkier, slower, have shorter battery lives, are less rugged and use mechanical hard drives that outright fail at higher cabin altitudes. I think the iPad is furthest along the tech curve in terms of size, weight, stability, and use of flash memory in place of a hard drive.
     
    TRAVELSIG and sobore like this.
  7. TRAVELSIG
    Original Member

    TRAVELSIG Gold Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    Likes Received:
    5,509
    Status Points:
    4,145
    Interesting information- Thanks. Strange that none of the aviation related electronics companies proposed an earlier solution?
     
  8. Travel2Food
    Original Member

    Travel2Food Silver Member

    Messages:
    445
    Likes Received:
    374
    Status Points:
    535
    Here's one of the other solutions in the Part 91 (bizjet/private) world. It runs on Windows 7: http://www.flightprep.com/rootpage.php?page=ChartBookS

    Certification requirements are different for Part 91 and Part 121 (commercial airlines). I'm guessing (and just guessing) that the light weight and low power requirements of the iPad combined with the Jepp data make a more compelling case than the earlier/Part 91 varieties.
     
  9. Eloy Fonseca Neto
    Original Member

    Eloy Fonseca Neto Silver Member

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    1,024
    Status Points:
    870
    I hope that they don't forget their charger!!!
     

Share This Page