100k Platinum Offer

Discussion in 'American Express | Membership Rewards' started by Efilon87, Oct 20, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    My mom received a 100k Platinum Amex offer in the mail this week. Almost had a heart attack when I saw it in the junk mail to-be-thrown-away pile. Needless to say, she isn't going to be applying for it. So I was wondering, would I be able to apply for the card with the same RSVP code? I already have an Amex Gold and Amex Business Gold. Would I get the signup bonus? Thanks!!

    Efilon87
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013
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  2. Sweet Willie
    Original Member

    Sweet Willie Gold Member

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    doubtful but worth a shot, worse they can say is no.

    I'm curious, does your Mom have other another AMEX card(s) or was she targeted by AMEX by some other means?
     
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  3. tondoleo
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    tondoleo Gold Member

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    You need to read the T&C's for your Mom's offer. Amex does not allow bonus points, at times, if someone is currently holding an account that collects MRs. Good luck.

    OT, if your Mom decides to get the card she can always transfer the points into her favourite child's airline account before she closes the card.
     
  4. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    You know she gets these offers from credit card companies all the time but she has never applied for a card. My dad only has three cards, Marriott, SW, and an LL Bean that he's had for YEARS. Trying to get him get more cards :). Now, mom is an authorized card holder for my dads cards, so maybe thats how she gets targeted.
     
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  5. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    Good to know. Reading the T&C now. Is there a charge for transferring MR to another account?
     
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  6. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    The other thing is that when I look up the offer using the RSVP code, there is no mention of the 100k offer. So there is no option to get a screenshot and the application has my moms name on it. This is good till November 29, so I may wait till mid November. Will Amex do a credit line shift to approve a new card?
     
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  7. skyhook
    Original Member

    skyhook Silver Member

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    Using someone else's RSVP code to apply with Amex will likely fail initially, based on some recent second-hand experience.

    Their systems will treat it as your application, but with your mom's name on it -- you'll need to call credit lending to resolve the issue, and I'm not sure if it can be done.
     
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  8. dmel

    dmel Gold Member

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    First-hand data point, though probably 1.5-2yrs old.

    My wife received a 100k plat offer addressed to her business (PLLC, with EIN). I used the RSVP code online and the form pre-populated with her business info. I changed all fields to my information (my name, home address instead of her work address, different phone number, my SSN instead of her EIN) and was approved without any hassle.
     
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  9. LarryInNYC

    LarryInNYC Gold Member

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    I want that card!
     
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  10. TAHKUCT
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    TAHKUCT Gold Member

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    That's nice to know as my wife has 100K offer for the business we no longer have. I might try this.
     
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  11. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    OT for this post, perhaps - but this needs to change NOW!!! If anything ever happened to your Dad, your Mom would be up s**t creek without a paddle, as she would have no significant credit history of her own. This is a common problem in my mother's generation: household roles were divided up more by sex when she was young, with the man expected to be the bill payer and family provider, and women weren't necessarily expected to work. The result is a generation of elderly women with little financial experience and no credit history to speak of, who face huge problems when they find themselves outliving their husband. Trust me, the results aren't pretty.

    Now obviously I'm not suggesting your Mom should run out and apply for an AmEx Platinum card (even if she has been targeted by their marketing department). ;-) But she should get a nice no annual fee cash back card or two under her own name, and start using them to build up a credit history of her own for the future, just to be safe. A Chase Freedom or Slate, or something like that. (And no, being an authorized user on someone else's account is NOT the same as having your own cards and doesn't confer nearly as much benefit to your credit score..)
     
  12. Scottrick
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    Scottrick Gold Member

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    Generally there is a splash page when applying for these targeted offers. You should be able to enter your mom's personal address, etc. to clear the splash page and then enter your own information on the actual application.
     
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  13. garyst16
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    garyst16 Silver Member

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    Send me the offer code... I will try it out and if it works, I will let you know... after all, what are your MP friends for?;)
     
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  14. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    Oh believe me, it was a struggle to get my dad to apply for a couple more CCs. Slowly introducing my mom to the idea. I mean it helps that I paid for their RT flights to/from Europe in business for their 30th anniversary. Need to slowly ease them both into it more. ;)
     
  15. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    Some people just don't care to play the points/miles game, and that's perfectly fine. What is NOT fine is for an adult man or woman to have no credit history. That's what I would stress to your Mom: she needs to have her own credit history so that if (God forbid) something bad happened to your Dad, she'd be able to qualify for car loans and that sort of thing. A simple cash back card with no annual fee is all she needs for now; if she gets more ambitious later, that card will still be a handy thing to have in her wallet.
     
  16. Mike Reed

    Mike Reed Gold Member

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    Why? Depending on their wealth either could quite possibly afford to buy a car with cash outright, especially if you're not buying new.

    For anything else significant there are enough companies left to do manual underwriting, especially if there's a longstanding banking relationship, that any other major purchase needed should process just fine, if not a little slower.
     
  17. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    Except that it's the husband who has the longstanding banking relationship in this case, Mike - and if he dies or is incapacitated, his relationship with the bank won't mean squat as far as his wife's case is concerned. Just because he always payed his bills on time doesn't mean she will: she's not him. Banks are very reluctant to extend credit to people with no significant credit history, regardless of how much wealth they may have. That's one of the ironies of modern life: many people who are extremely financially responsible and who have deliberately made a point of avoiding debt as much as possible, paying cash for everything, etc., find that if they DO need to borrow money, they can't. Those who have been less responsible and run up debts (but then repaid them on schedule) have no trouble because they have the better FICO scores.

    There's no need to court that sort of trouble. If the OP's mother can responsibly handle a credit card tied to her husband's account, she can handle one of her own just as easily. And doing that will give her a credit history that may well come in handy in the future.
     
  18. Mike Reed

    Mike Reed Gold Member

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    This hasn't been my experience, and as a married couple with joint accounts their status (and accounts) are properly tied together such that his history is hers and vice-versa.

    The myth that credit is needed for modern life is just that: a myth. I'm not anti-credit in any sort of way but I do see that our society is selling the lie that buying on credit is somehow a better thing than buying on cash to people that have no idea how to manage a cash account, much less a more intricate credit line with an interest rate and repayment schedule.

    In this case, so long as appropriate cash (or equivalent) or cash generating vehicles are in place to provide for her, any credit decisions can easily be made on her joint history and, more importantly, her current liquidity position. It just takes finding someone willing to do it, which is harder and harder to find outside of a good banking relationship.

    Should she still use credit, occasionally, when it benefits her? Of course. Should she be dependent on it? Absolutely not.
     
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  19. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    We've veered waaay off topic. Getting us back on track here.....I guess the only way to find out if this will work is to apply for it and see if they will award the bonus.
     
  20. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    Will Amex do a credit line shift for a card holder to approve a new credit card?
     
  21. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    They share assets and responsibility for delinquent debt, sure. They don't share FICO scores. And it's FICO scores I'm concerned about here, because that's the primary tool most banks use in determining credit-worthiness these days. The OP said his mother is an authorized user of his father's credit cards. Those aren't shared accounts, those ares HIS accounts.

    Oh, I agree with most of that. It's absolutely moronic that people who follow the advice of folks like Dave Ramsey often have worse credit scores than folks who are total spendthrifts. But you and I don't make the rules; we're just stuck playing by them. And there's absolutely no disadvantage to having a high FICO score if (and for many people, I'll grant you this is a very big if) a person is responsible with money and always pays bills in full and on time. Which I suspect the OP's mom would do.

    (Where I disagree is that some things, like renting a car or a hotel room, are inordinately difficult if you live a cash-only life and only have a debit card. But that's only an issue if you travel, and a lot of people - especially older people - don't..)

    And that's the problem: the Bailey Building and Loan went out of business quite a while ago, to be replaced by Potter's Heartless Megabank. Unless you're banking with a smaller local bank, there's a limit to how much an individual banker is going to be able to bend the company rules.. (Which is certainly a good argument for using a local bank if possible!) So why not have a good FICO score, just for safety's sake, so the rules don't have to be bent?

    I agree 100% with this.

    But I see no harm, and much good, in making sure each person in a relationship has a good credit score of their own. And it's not hard to do - just make sure each person has their name on at least one utility bill, and each person has a bank account and credit card of their own (if they use credit cards). Why not have Mom open up a credit card and put Dad on that account as an authorized user instead of the other way around? One card for Mom (with Dad as an authorized user) and one card for Dad (with Mom as an authorized user) is better, from the standpoint of generating a good credit score for each person, than two cards under Dad's name with Mom as authorized user on both. So why not do that? The answer is simply that most people just don't stop to think about it.
     
  22. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    Agreed, so I'll shut up now. :D

    And I also agree there's no way to know in advance what AmEx will do. So as long as the OP genuinely wants the card and is willing to risk a rejection, there's no harm in trying.
     
  23. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    From what I've heard AmEx seems less willing to do that than Chase, so I wouldn't count on it.
     
  24. wellseeee

    wellseeee New Member

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    i tried that last week, they won't accept it.
     
  25. Efilon87

    Efilon87 Silver Member

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    What did they say exactly?
     

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