TSA Testing Fingerprint Screening at Security Checkpoints

If you’re not already enrolled in TSA’s PreCheck program, this new screening process may be another reason to sign up.

What is likely to become the new era of airport security began this week at Atlanta and Denver airports, where the Transportation Security Administration is real-world testing a new way to confirm travelers’ identities.

According to a TSA statement:

TSA is conducting a proof of concept demonstration to evaluate the operational and security impact of using biometrics to verify passengers’ identities using their fingerprints. The biometric authentication technology enables a traveler’s fingerprints to serve as both a boarding pass and identity document.

In other words, a traveler’s fingerprints will take the place of his boarding pass and personal identification, making for security checks that are both faster and more secure.

So, where does the TSA get fingerprints to compare against those of travelers passing through security checkpoints? To begin with, the new identity-verification system will only be available to flyers who have submitted their fingerprints as part of the process of enrolling in the PreCheck trusted-traveler program.

In the trial phase, PreCheck travelers can volunteer to have their identities matched to their fingerprints, or not; they will still be subject to normal screening, including a check of their boarding pass and identity document.

The TSA was mum on the projected timing of a wider roll-out of the technology. In the meantime, the prospect of an even speedier route through security is yet another reason to invest $85 for a five-year PreCheck membership.

Reader Reality Check

Creepy or cool?

After 20 years working in the travel industry, and almost that long writing about it, Tim Winship knows a thing or two about travel. Follow him on Twitter @twinship.

This article first appeared on SmarterTravel.com, where Tim is Editor-at-Large.

Comments

  1. Counsellor says

    ” a traveler’s fingerprints will take the place of his boarding pass and personal identification, making for security checks that are both faster and more secure.”

    OK, but how will they issue seat assignments in a way the passenger can know and demonstrate that a seat is his?

  2. Tim Winship says

    Presumably pax will still be issued boarding passes, for just that reason. The alternative would be chaos.

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